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Solanum scabrum - Mill.

Common Name Garden Huckleberry
Family Solanaceae
USDA hardiness 5-9
Known Hazards There is a lot of disagreement over whether or not the leaves or fruit of this plant are poisonous. Views vary from relatively poisonous to perfectly safe to eat. The plant is cultivated as a food crop, both for its fruit and its leaves, in some parts of the world and it is probably true to say that toxicity can vary considerably according to where the plant is grown and the cultivar that is being grown[4, 7, 10, 13, 65, 76]. The unripe fruit contains the highest concentration of toxins[65].
Habitats Not known in the wild.
Range A form of S. nigrum derived in cultivation.
Edibility Rating    (3 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (2 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full sun
Solanum scabrum Garden Huckleberry


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Marco_Schmidt
Solanum scabrum Garden Huckleberry

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Solanum scabrum is a ANNUAL growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in).
See above for USDA hardiness. It is hardy to UK zone 6. It is in flower from July to September, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

S. intrusum. S. melanocerasum. All. S. scabrum.

Habitats

 Cultivated Beds;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Fruit  Leaves  Shoots
Edible Uses:

Fruit - cooked[2, 27, 89, 179]. Used in preserves, jams and pies[183]. A pleasant musky taste[85]. Only the fully ripe fruits should be used, the unripe fruits contain the toxin solanine[65, 173, 183]. Often cooked with some baking soda first in order to remove any bitterness. The fruit contains about 2.5% protein, 0.6% fat, 5.6% carbohydrate, 1.2% ash[179]. The fruit is up to 12mm in diameter[200]. Young leaves and new shoots - raw or cooked as a potherb or added to soups[2, 27, 85, 89, 173, 179, 183]. See notes at the top of the page regarding possible toxicity.

References   More on Edible Uses

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Antiperiodic  Antiphlogistic  Diaphoretic  Diuretic  Febrifuge  Narcotic  Purgative

The whole plant is antiperiodic, antiphlogistic, diaphoretic, diuretic, emollient, febrifuge, narcotic, purgative and sedative[4, 21, 145, 147, 192, 218]. It is harvested in the autumn when both flowers and fruit are upon the plant, and is dried for later use[4]. Use with caution[21], see notes above on toxicity. The leaves, stems and roots are used in the treatment of cancerous sores, leucoderma and wounds[218]. Extracts of the plant are analgesic, antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator[218]. The plant has been used in the manufacture of locally analgesic ointments and the juice of the fruit has been used as an analgesic for toothaches[7].

References   More on Medicinal Uses

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Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

Succeeds in most soils[1]. Dislikes shade[1]. Caterpillars and slugs are particularly fond of this plant and can totally destroy it[K]. This is a cultivated form of S. nigrum, grown for its edible fruit. There is at least one named form[183]. See notes about possible toxicity at the top of this page. There is some disagreement among taxonomists as to the correct name of this plant. It is also listed as S. melanocerasum[200]. Grows well with clover[18]. Does not grow well with wormwood or white mustard and, when these plants are growing Closely related to S. nigra, they increase its content of toxic alkaloids[18].

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

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Propagation

Seed - sow spring in situ. The seed can also be sown in a greenhouse during the spring if required since this will normally produce larger crops of fruit. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant out in late spring.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Solanum aethiopicumMock Tomato, Ethiopian nightshadeShrub2.5 10-12  LMHNM322
Solanum ajanhuiriAjanhuiriPerennial0.0 9-11  LMHSNM20 
Solanum americanumAmerican Nightshade, American black nightshadeAnnual1.0 0-0  LMHNM100
Solanum andigenumAndigenaPerennial0.0 -  LMHNM20 
Solanum aviculareKangaroo Apple, New Zealand nightshadeShrub1.8 8-11  LMHNM222
Solanum boreale Perennial0.0 -  LMHNM10 
Solanum boyacense Perennial0.0 -  LMHNM10 
Solanum cari Perennial0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Solanum carolinenseHorse Nettle, Carolina horsenettlePerennial1.0 3-7  LMHSNM021
Solanum chauchaChauchaPerennial0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Solanum curtilobumRuckiPerennial0.0 -  LMHSNM20 
Solanum dulcamaraBittersweet. Bittersweet Nightshade, Climbing nightshade, Bittersweet, Deadly Nightshade, PoisonousPerennial Climber2.5 4-8 MLMHSNM030
Solanum fendleriWild Potato, Fendler's horsenettle, Texan horsenettlePerennial0.0 0-0  LMHNM32 
Solanum jamesiiColorado Wild Potato, Wild potatoPerennial0.2 8-11  LMHNM20 
Solanum juzepczukiiRuckiPerennial0.0 -  LMHSNM20 
Solanum kurzii Perennial0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Solanum laciniatumKangaroo AppleShrub3.0 8-11  LMHNM222
Solanum linearifoliumMountain Kangaroo AppleShrub0.0 -  LMHNM20 
Solanum liximitante Perennial0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Solanum luteum Annual0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Solanum lycopersicumTomato, Garden TomatoAnnual2.0 10-12 FLMHNM533
Solanum lyratum Perennial Climber2.0 -  LMHNM12 
Solanum maglia Perennial0.0 -  LMHNM20 
Solanum melongenaAubergine, EggplantPerennial1.0 8-11  LMHNM32 
Solanum muricatumPepinoShrub1.0 8-11  LMHNM400
Solanum nigrumBlack Nightshade, Common Nightshade, Poisonberry, Black NightshadeAnnual0.6 0-0  LMHNDM222
Solanum paniculatumJurubeba, NightshadeShrub2.0 10-12 FLMHSNM040
Solanum phurejaPhureja, NightshadePerennial0.0 8-11  LMHSNM30 
Solanum piliferum Perennial0.0 -  LMHNM20 
Solanum pimpinellifoliumCurrant TomatoAnnual/Biennial1.0 10-12 FLMHNM422
12

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

Mill.

Botanical References

200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

   Fri Nov 9 2007

Solanum scabrum and Solanum melanocerasum (not melanocerum), as I known, are the same plant species and the English common name garden huckleberry for this plant is false, because the huckleberries belong to an another family, Vaccinium

ade   Tue Sep 21 14:14:10 2004

solanum scabrum is not the same plant as the garden huckleberry,solanum melanocerum although closely related.its common name is african nightshade

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