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Scrophularia nodosa - L.

Common Name Knotted Figwort, Woodland figwort
Family Scrophulariaceae
USDA hardiness 6-9
Known Hazards Avoid in patients with ventricular tachycardia (increased heart rate). Lack of toxicological data excludes use during pregnancy [301].
Habitats Damp ground in woods, hedgebanks, by streams etc[9]. An occasional garden weed[1].
Range Europe, incl Britain, south and east from Norway to Spain and temperate Asia to the Yensei region.
Edibility Rating    (1 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (3 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Scrophularia nodosa Knotted Figwort, Woodland figwort


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Scrophularia nodosa Knotted Figwort, Woodland figwort
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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Scrophularia nodosa is a PERENNIAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in) by 0.3 m (1ft).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from June to September, and the seeds ripen from July to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, wasps.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge; Hedgerow;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Root
Edible Uses:

Root - cooked[4]. It smells and tastes unpleasant, but has been used in times of famine[4, 238]. There must be some doubts about the edibility of this root[K].

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Alterative  Anodyne  Anthelmintic  Antiinflammatory  Diuretic  Purgative  Stimulant

Knotted figwort is a plant that supports detoxification of the body and it may be used as a treatment for various kinds of skin disorders[254]. The whole plant is alterative, anodyne, anti-inflammatory, diuretic, mildly purgative and stimulant[4, 9, 21, 165]. It is harvested as the plant comes into flower in the summer and can be dried for later use[4]. A decoction is applied externally to sprains, swellings, burns, inflammations etc, and is said to be useful in treating chronic skin diseases, scrofulous sores and gangrene[4, 254]. The leaves can also be applied fresh or be made into an ointment[4]. Internally, the plant is used in the treatment of chronic skin diseases (such as eczema, psoriasis and pruritis), mastitis, swollen lymph nodes and poor circulation[238]. It should not be prescribed for patients with heart conditions[238]. The root is anthelmintic[9].

References

Now available: PLANTS FOR YOUR FOOD FOREST: 500 Plants for Temperate Food Forests and Permaculture Gardens.

An important new book from PFAF. It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. The book suggests that community and small-scale food forests can provide a real alternative to intensive industrialised agriculture, and help to combat the many inter-related environmental crises that threaten the very future of life on Earth.

Read More

FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

Succeeds in most moist to wet soils in full sun or partial shade[238]. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c[238].

References

Temperature Converter

Type a value in the Celsius field to convert the value to Fahrenheit:

Fahrenheit:

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The PFAF Bookshop

Plants For A Future have a number of books available in paperback and digital form. Book titles include Edible Plants, Edible Perennials, Edible Trees, and Woodland Gardening. Our new book to be released soon is Edible Shrubs.

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Propagation

Seed - sow spring or autumn in a cold frame[238]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. If you have sufficient seed then it can be sown outdoors in situ in the autumn or the spring. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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123

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

L.

Botanical References

17200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Scrophularia was the cornerstone of the Eli Jones cancer formula, Compound Syrup Scrophularia. He referred to marilandica but, as noted, the properties are quite similar to those of nodosa. My experience with this herb is that it resolves many kinds of lymphatic disorders, lumps the size of nectarines can disappear within ten days. I believe this formula is an excellent parasiticide, this based on my use of darkfield microscopy where it was evident that blood parasites were cleared in days after beginning the use of the Jones formula. So far as gardening goes, I might offer a few observations. First, this plant is deeply loved by bees. It is prolific and flowers very early in the season and there are still blooms late in year. The bees protect this plant more than any other I have growing in my garden. Second, it grows much taller than stated here, closer to three meters than one.   Aug 3 2011 12:00AM

Scrophularia was the cornerstone of the Eli Jones cancer formula, Compound Syrup Scrophularia. He referred to marilandica but, as noted, the properties are quite similar to those of nodosa. My experience with this herb is that it resolves many kinds of lymphatic disorders, lumps the size of nectarines can disappear within ten days. I believe this formula is an excellent parasiticide, this based on my use of darkfield microscopy where it was evident that blood parasites were cleared in days after beginning the use of the Jones formula. So far as gardening goes, I might offer a few observations. First, this plant is deeply loved by bees. It is prolific and flowers very early in the season and there are still blooms late in year. The bees protect this plant more than any other I have growing in my garden. Second, it grows much taller than stated here, closer to three meters than one.
Ingrid Naiman

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