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Rosa woodsii - Lindl.

Common Name Western Wild Rose, Woods' rose, Tehachapi rose
Family Rosaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards There is a layer of hairs around the seeds just beneath the flesh of the fruit. These hairs can cause irritation to the mouth and digestive tract if ingested.
Habitats Moist soils of draws, hillsides, along streams and in open valleys. It often forms thickets in open positions[212].
Range Central and Western N. America -Minnesota to Missouri, Northwest Territory, New Mexico and Colorado.
Edibility Rating    (2 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (2 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Rosa woodsii Western Wild Rose, Woods


(c) Steve Flanagan
Rosa woodsii Western Wild Rose, Woods
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rosa_woodsii_RHS.jpeg

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of shrub
Rosa woodsii is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2 m (6ft 7in).
See above for USDA hardiness. It is hardy to UK zone 4. It is in flower from June to July, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers  Fruit  Stem
Edible Uses: Tea

Fruit - raw or cooked[101, 155, 257]. They are used in making jams, jellies etc. The taste and texture are best after a frost[116]. The fruit can also be dried and used to make a pleasant tasting fruity-flavoured tea[183]. The fruit is up to 15mm in diameter[200], but there is only a thin layer of flesh surrounding the many seeds[K]. Some care has to be taken when eating this fruit, see the notes above on known hazards. Young shoots - raw[172]. Harvested whilst still tender in the spring, they are best peeled[257]. Petals - raw. Remove the bitter white base[172]. The seed is a good source of vitamin E, it can be ground into a powder and mixed with flour or added to other foods as a supplement[102, 183]. Be sure to remove the seed hairs[102]. The bark, young shoots, leaves and fruit have all been used to make tea-like beverages[257].

References   More on Edible Uses

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Analgesic  Astringent  Cancer  Diuretic  Foot care  Poultice  Salve  Stings  
Women's complaints

The seeds have been used as a poultice to produce a drawing effect for treating muscular pains[257]. An infusion of the leaves has been used as a spring tonic[257]. A poultice of the chewed leaves has been used to allay the pain of bee stings[257]. The leaves have been placed in the shoes as a protection from athletes foot[257]. The roots are blood tonic and diuretic[257]. A decoction of the roots has been used by adults and children in the treatment of diarrhoea and intestinal influenza[257]. A decoction of the root or inner bark has been used in the treatment of colds[257]. An infusion of the fruits has been used in the treatment of coughs[257]. Various parts of the plant have been used to make poultices to apply to burns, sores, cuts, swellings and wounds[257]. A decoction of the branches, combined with chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) and red willow (Salix bonplandiana), has been used in the treatment of various women's complaints, diarrhoea and vomiting[257]. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers[214].

References   More on Medicinal Uses

Now available: PLANTS FOR YOUR FOOD FOREST: 500 Plants for Temperate Food Forests and Permaculture Gardens.

An important new book from PFAF. It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. The book suggests that community and small-scale food forests can provide a real alternative to intensive industrialised agriculture, and help to combat the many inter-related environmental crises that threaten the very future of life on Earth.

Read More

FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

Succeeds in most well-drained soils[11], preferring a circumneutral soil and a sunny position[200]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Dislikes water-logged soils[200]. Grows well with alliums, parsley, mignonette and lupins[18, 20]. Garlic planted nearby can help protect the plant from disease and insect predation[18, 20]. Grows badly with boxwood[18]. Closely related to and hybridizes in the wild with R. blanda[11]. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[80]. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus[200].

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

Temperature Converter

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The PFAF Bookshop

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Propagation

Seed. Rose seed often takes two years to germinate. This is because it may need a warm spell of weather after a cold spell in order to mature the embryo and reduce the seedcoat[80]. One possible way to reduce this time is to scarify the seed and then place it for 2 - 3 weeks in damp peat at a temperature of 27 - 32°c (by which time the seed should have imbibed). It is then kept at 3°c for the next 4 months by which time it should be starting to germinate[80]. Alternatively, it is possible that seed harvested 'green' (when it is fully developed but before it has dried on the plant) and sown immediately will germinate in the late winter. This method has not as yet(1988) been fully tested[80]. Seed sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame sometimes germinates in spring though it may take 18 months. Stored seed can be sown as early in the year as possible and stratified for 6 weeks at 5°c[200]. It may take 2 years to germinate[200]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Plant out in the summer if the plants are more than 25cm tall, otherwise grow on in a cold frame for the winter and plant out in late spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July in a shaded frame. Overwinter the plants in the frame and plant out in late spring[78]. High percentage[78]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current seasons growth. Select pencil thick shoots in early autumn that are about 20 - 25cm long and plant them in a sheltered position outdoors or in a cold frame[78, 200]. The cuttings can take 12 months to establish but a high percentage of them normally succeed[78]. Division of suckers in the dormant season. Plant them out direct into their permanent positions. Layering. Takes 12 months[11].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

Lindl.

Botanical References

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Links / References

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Readers comment

   Wed Nov 4 2009

The rosa woodsii is a very pretty flower.We should really keep it here.

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