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Aralia continentalis - Kitag.

Common Name Manchurian Spikenard
Family Araliaceae
USDA hardiness 7-10
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Not known
Range E. Asia - W. and N. China, Korea, Siberia.
Edibility Rating    (2 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care (info)
Frost Hardy Moist Soil Full shade Semi-shade
Aralia continentalis Manchurian Spikenard


Aralia continentalis Manchurian Spikenard

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Aralia continentalis is a PERENNIAL growing to 2 m (6ft 7in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8 and is frost tender. It is in flower from July to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) or semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Leaves  Root  Stem
Edible Uses:

The following uses are for the closely related A. cordata. It is quite possible that they also apply to this species[K]. Shoots - cooked or raw[2, 46, 61, 105, 177]. They can be up to 1.5 metres long and have a mild and agreeable flavour[116]. They are usually blanched and are crisp and tender with a unique lemon-like flavour[183]. They can be sliced and added to salads, soups etc[206]. The shoots contain about 1.1% protein, 0.42% fat, 0.8% soluble carbohydrate, 0.55% ash[179]. Root - cooked[22, 105, 177]. Used like scorzonera[2].

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


None known

References

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FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

Prefers a deep moderately fertile moisture-retentive well-drained loam and a semi-shady position[1, 11, 200]. Requires a sheltered position[200]. Plants are hardier when grown in poorer soils[200]. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c[200]. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun[K]. This species is closely related to A. cordata[200].

References

Temperature Converter

Type a value in the Celsius field to convert the value to Fahrenheit:

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The PFAF Bookshop

Plants For A Future have a number of books available in paperback and digital form. Book titles include Edible Plants, Edible Perennials, Edible Trees, and Woodland Gardening. Our new book to be released soon is Edible Shrubs.

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Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed requires 3 - 5 months of cold stratification. Germination usually takes place within 1 - 4 months at 20°c[134]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Once the plants are 25cm or more tall, they can be planted out into their permanent positions, late spring or early summer being the best time to do this. Root cuttings 8cm long, December in a cold frame[11, 78]. Store the roots upside down in sand and pot up in March/April. High percentage[78]. Division of suckers in late winter[11]. Very easy, the suckers can be planted out direct into their permanent positions if required.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Aralia chinensisChinese Angelica Tree, Pumila Spirea, Chinese AstilbeShrub3.5 4-8 MLMHFSM22 
Aralia cordataUdoPerennial1.8 4-9  LMHFSM420
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Aralia hispidaBristly SarsaparillaShrub1.0 3-7  LMHSNDM212
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Aralia racemosaAmerican SpikenardPerennial1.8 4-8  LMHFSM332
Aralia schmidtiiSakhalin SpikenardPerennial3.0 4-8  LMHFSM20 
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Eleutherococcus divaricatus Shrub3.5 5-9  LMHSNM20 
Eleutherococcus gracylistylusWu Jia PiShrub3.0 5-9  LMHSNM13 
Eleutherococcus innovansTaka-No-TsumeTree6.0 6-9  LMHNM10 
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Eleutherococcus senticosusSiberian GinsengShrub2.0 3-7 SLMHSNM25 
Eleutherococcus seoulensis Shrub0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Eleutherococcus sessiliflorus Shrub4.5 4-8  LMHSNM23 
Eleutherococcus sieboldianusUkogi, Five Leafed AraliaShrub3.0 4-8 SLMHSNM302
Eleutherococcus spinosus Shrub3.0 4-8  LMHSNM22 
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Hedera helixIvy, English ivy, Algerian ivy, Baltic Ivy, Common IvyClimber15.0 5-11 MLMHFSNMWe034
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Kalopanax sciadophylloides Tree0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Kalopanax septemlobusTree Aralia, Castor araliaTree25.0 4-8 SLMHSNM21 
Kirkophytum lyallii Perennial0.2 -  LMHSNM10 
Oplopanax horridusDevil's ClubShrub2.0 4-8  LMHFSM22 
Panax ginsengGinseng, Chinese ginsengPerennial0.8 5-9  LMHFSM25 
Panax japonicusJapanese GinsengPerennial0.6 -  LMHFSM11 
Panax pseudoginsengGinseng, Japanese ginsengPerennial1.0 5-9 SLMHFSM13 
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Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

Kitag.

Botanical References

200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

   Nov 3 2011 12:00AM

Therefore, we suggest that HY251from the roots of Aralia continentalis, a novel androgen antagonist, may be a potent cancer chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of both androgen-sensitive and hormone-refractory prostate cancer. HY251, a novel decahydrocyclopenta[a]indene analog, from Aralia continentalis induces apoptosis via down-regulation of AR expression in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2011 Mar 1;21(5):1347-9 Authors: Oh HL, Lee CH

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