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Lilium lancifolium - Thunb.

Common Name Tiger Lily, Devil Lily
Family Liliaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards The pollen is said to be poisonous, producing vomiting, drowsiness and purging[4].
Habitats Long cultivated and not known in a truly wild situation, though it can naturalise in woodlands[279].. Possibly of hybrid origin involving L. leichtlinii and L. maculatum[90].
Range E. Asia - China, Japan, Korea.
Edibility Rating    (4 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (2 of 5)
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Lilium lancifolium Tiger Lily, Devil Lily


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Llez
Lilium lancifolium Tiger Lily, Devil Lily
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Llez

 

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Summary

Bloom Color: Orange. Main Bloom Time: Early fall, Late summer. Form: Upright or erect.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of bulb
Lilium lancifolium is a BULB growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 4. It is in flower from August to September, and the seeds ripen from September to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. The plant is not self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

L. tigrinum.

Habitats

Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers  Root
Edible Uses:

Bulb - cooked[2, 4, 42, 47]. Somewhat bitterish[105]. Fairly pleasant, when properly cooked they are highly esteemed as a vegetable and somewhat resemble parsnips in flavour[183]. The bulbs are up to 8cm in diameter[266]. They are a good source of starch[105, 183]. The bulb can be dried and ground into powder. Flowers - raw or cooked. Used fresh or dried in salads, soups, rice dishes etc[183].

Medicinal Uses

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Antiinflammatory  Cardiac  Carminative  Diuretic  Emmenagogue  Emollient  Expectorant  Ophthalmic  
Women's complaints

The bulb is antiinflammatory, diuretic, emmenagogue, emollient and expectorant[240, 279]. They are used to relieve heart diseases, pain in the cardiac region and angina pectoris[240]. They are used in Korea to treat coughs, sore throats, palpitations and boils[279]. The flowers are carminative[240]. They are used to strengthen the eye-lid muscles and are commended in the treatment of myopic astigmatism[240]. A tincture made from the flowering plant, harvested when in full flower, is used in the treatment of uterine neuralgia, congestion, irritation and the nausea of pregnancy[4]. It relieves the bearing-down pain accompanying uterine prolapse and is an important remedy in ovarian neuralgia[4].

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Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

Food Forest

Cultivation details

Landscape Uses:Border, Container, Foundation, Massing, Seashore. Prefers an open free-draining humus-rich loamy soil with its roots in the shade and its head in the sun[200]. Prefers a lime-free soil according to some reports[28, 47, 143], whilst one says that it succeeds in a calcareous soil[1] and another that it succeeds in ordinary garden soil[1, 42]. Prefers a deep acid loam[47]. Likes a sunny position according to one report[143] whilst others say that it is best grown in open woodland or amongst dwarf evergreen shrubs[1]. Stem rooting, the bulbs should be planted 15 - 20cm deep[143]. Early to mid autumn is the best time to plant out the bulbs in cool temperate areas, in warmer areas they can be planted out as late as late autumn[200]. Plants grow well in northern gardens in Britain[90]. A sterile triploid species, probably of hybrid origin[90]. A very ornamental plant[1], it is cultivated for its edible bulb in Japan[2, 42, 163]. This species tolerates virus infections, but it can transmit them to other species in this genus and so is best grown away from any of the other species[47]. The plant should be protected against rabbits and slugs in early spring. If the shoot tip is eaten out the bulb will not grow in that year and will lose vigour[200]. The plant is heat tolerant in zones 8 through 1. (Plant Hardiness Zones show how well plants withstand cold winter temperatures. Plant Heat Zones show when plants would start suffering from the heat. The Plant Heat Zone map is based on the number of "heat days" experienced in a given area where the temperature climbs to over 86 degrees F (30°C). At this temperature, many plants begin to suffer physiological damage. Heat Zones range from 1 (no heat days) to 12 (210 or more heat days). For example Heat Zone. 11-1 indicates that the plant is heat tolerant in zones 11 through 1.) For polyculture design as well as the above-ground architecture (form - tree, shrub etc. and size shown above) information on the habit and root pattern is also useful and given here if available. The plant growth habit is a clumper with limited spread [1-2]. The root pattern is a bulb.

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Propagation

Seed - this species is completely sterile and does not produce seed. Division with care in the autumn once the leaves have died down. Replant immediately[200]. Bulb scales can be removed from the bulbs in early autumn. If they are kept in a warm dark place in a bag of moist peat, they will produce bulblets. These bulblets can be potted up and grown on in the greenhouse until they are large enough to plant out[200]. Bulbils - gather in late summer when they start to fall off the stems and pot up immediately. Grow on in a greenhouse until large enough to go outside[200]. Plants can flower in three years from bulbils[4].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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12

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

Thunb.

Botanical References

200266

Links / References

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Readers comment

   Sep 7 2017 12:00AM

The bulb is known as "yurine" or "yuri-ne" in Japanese, and "bai he" in Chinese; it is often referred to simply as "lily bulb" in English translations of recipes. It is commonly stir fried or added to simmered dishes like Nishime.

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