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Sambucus gaudichaudiana - DC.

Common Name White Elderberry
Family Caprifoliaceae
USDA hardiness Coming soon
Known Hazards Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, the leaves and stems of some, if not all, members of this genus are poisonous[9, 76]. The fruit of many species (although no records have been seen for this species) has been known to cause stomach upsets to some people. Any toxin the fruit might contain is liable to be of very low toxicity and is destroyed when the fruit is cooked[65, 76].
Habitats Cool shady places in wet sclerophyll and other open forests, river banks and damp rocks[144, 154, 193, 265].
Range Australia - New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria.
Edibility Rating    (2 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care (info)
Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Sambucus gaudichaudiana White Elderberry


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Melburnian
Sambucus gaudichaudiana White Elderberry

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of shrub
Sambucus gaudichaudiana is a deciduous Shrub growing to 3 m (9ft 10in). The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers  Fruit
Edible Uses:

Fruit - raw or cooked. Juicy[144, 177]. The fruit is a little sour but has a pleasant flavour[144]. Usually sweet, though some forms are bitter[193]. The fruit is small but is borne in large clusters, making it easy to harvest[K]. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity. Flowers - raw or cooked.

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


None known

References

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FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it is only likely to be hardy outdoors in the mildest areas of the country. The plant is more of a sub-shrub, producing annual shoots from a perennial rootstock[265]. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Tolerates most soils, including chalk[200], but prefers a moist loamy soil[1, 200]. Tolerates some shade but is best in a sunny position[1]. Tolerates atmospheric pollution and coastal situations[200]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200].

References

Temperature Converter

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Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame, when it should germinate in early spring. Stored seed can be sown in the spring in a cold frame but will probably germinate better if it is given 2 months warm followed by 2 months cold stratification first[78, 98, 113]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. If good growth is made, the young plants can be placed in their permanent positions during the early summer. Otherwise, either put them in a sheltered nursery bed, or keep them in their pots in a sheltered position and plant them out in spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame[78]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current season's growth, 15 - 20cm with a heel, late autumn in a frame or a sheltered outdoor bed[78].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Sambucus australasicaYellow ElderberryShrub6.0 -  LMHSNM20 
Sambucus caeruleaBlue ElderShrub3.0 4-8 MLMHSNDM423
Sambucus chinensisChinese ElderPerennial1.5 7-10  LMHSNM21 
Sambucus ebulusDwarf Elder, Dwarf elderberryPerennial1.2 4-8 FLMHSNM12 
Sambucus javanicaChinese ElderShrub0.0 -  LMHSNM12 
Sambucus latipinna Shrub0.0 -  LMHSNM10 
Sambucus melanocarpaBlack Elder, Rocky Mountain elderShrub4.0 5-9  LMHSNM22 
Sambucus mexicanaMexican ElderShrub1.0 3-9  LMHSNM210
Sambucus microbotrysRed ElderShrub2.0 5-9  LMHSNM10 
Sambucus nigraElderberry - European Elder, Black elderberry, American black elderberry, Blue elderberry, EuropeaShrub6.0 5-7 FLMHSNM435
Sambucus nigra spp canadensisAmerican ElderShrub4.0 3-9 FLMHSNM433
Sambucus pubensAmerican Red ElderShrub4.0 4-8  LMHSNM311
Sambucus racemosaRed Elder, Red elderberry, Rocky Mountain elder, European Red ElderberryShrub3.0 3-7 MLMHSNM322
Sambucus racemosa kamtschaticaRed ElderShrub3.0 4-8  LMHSNM322
Sambucus racemosa sieboldiana Shrub4.0 0-0 MLMHSNM102
Sambucus racemosa var. racemosaRed Coast ElderShrub3.0 5-9  LMHSNM322
Sambucus wightianaElderPerennial1.0 -  LMHSNM02 
Sambucus williamsii Shrub0.0 -  LMHSNM12 

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

DC.

Botanical References

154265

Links / References

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Readers comment

A Knight   Sat Feb 7 2009

This recipe for white elder wine was published in 1929 in Cornish Recipes Ancient and Modern and issued by the Cornwall Federation of Women's Institutes. To a quarter peck of elder flowers from a tree that bears white berries allow 18lbs white powdered sugar, 6 gallons water and the well beaten whites of two eggs. Boil these latter ingredients together and remove scum before adding the elder flowers, taking off the fire before doing so. When nearly cold stir and add 6 spoonfuls of lemon juice and 4oz yeast. Beat these well into the liquor and stir it every day for 3 days. Put into a cask with 6lbs stoned raisins and tun the wine. Stop it close and bottle in 6 months. The wine will keep for years.

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