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Robinia neomexicana - A.Gray.

Common Name New Mexico Locust, Rusby's locust, Locust
Family Fabaceae or Leguminosae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards The bark, root and seed are said to be poisonous[155].
Habitats Mountain canyons and plains[82], generally in sunny positions in moist soils by streams[149], 1200 - 2500 metres[229].
Range South-western N. America - Texas to New Mexico, Utah and Nevada.
Edibility Rating    (1 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (1 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Robinia neomexicana New Mexico Locust, Rusby


http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benutzer:Michael_wRobinia pseudoacacia
Robinia neomexicana New Mexico Locust, Rusby
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:JerryFriedman

 

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Summary

Bloom Color: Pink, Red. Main Bloom Time: Mid summer. Form: Upright or erect, Variable spread.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of lolypop
Robinia neomexicana is a deciduous Tree growing to 2 m (6ft 7in) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5. It is in flower from July to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs).
It can fix Nitrogen.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Sunny Edge;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers  Seed  Seedpod
Edible Uses:

Flowers - raw or cooked[105, 155, 161, 183, 257]. They can be used as a flavouring in cooked dishes[257]. The flowers can be boiled, then dried and stored for later use[257]. Seedpods - raw or cooked[229, 257]. They are gathered in the fall and eaten when fresh[229]. The pods can also be cooked then dried and stored for later use[257]. Seed - cooked[229, 257].

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Antirheumatic  Emetic

Antirheumatic[149, 216]. An emetic, it is used to clear the stomach[216, 257].

References

Now available: PLANTS FOR YOUR FOOD FOREST: 500 Plants for Temperate Food Forests and Permaculture Gardens.

An important new book from PFAF. It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. The book suggests that community and small-scale food forests can provide a real alternative to intensive industrialised agriculture, and help to combat the many inter-related environmental crises that threaten the very future of life on Earth.

Read More

FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

Soil stabilization  Wood

Plants succeed in dry barren sites, their suckering habit making them suitable for stabilizing banks[200, 229]. Wood - tough, elastic and durable[155, 257]. Used for fence posts etc[155].

Special Uses

Carbon Farming  Nitrogen Fixer

References

Cultivation details

Agroforestry Services: Nitrogen  Fodder: Bank  Industrial Crop: Biomass  Management: Coppice  Regional Crop

Landscape Uses:Specimen. Succeeds in a hot dry position. Succeeds in any soil, preferring one that is not too rich[1, 200]. Requires a well-drained soil, succeeding on dry barren sites[200]. Plants are tolerant of drought and atmospheric pollution[200]. The branches are brittle and very liable to wind damage[200]. When plants are grown in rich soils they produce coarse and rank growth which is even more liable to wind damage[11, 200]. Plants can be coppiced[155]. Any pruning should be done in late summer in order to reduce the risk of bleeding[200]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200]. Special Features: North American native, Naturalizing, Attractive flowers or blooms.

Carbon Farming

  • Agroforestry Services: Nitrogen  Plants that contribute to nitrogen fixation include the legume family – Fabaceae.
  • Fodder: Bank  Fodder banks are plantings of high-quality fodder species. Their goal is to maintain healthy productive animals. They can be utilized all year, but are designed to bridge the forage scarcity of annual dry seasons. Fodder bank plants are usually trees or shrubs, and often legumes. The relatively deep roots of these woody perennials allow them to reach soil nutrients and moisture not available to grasses and herbaceous plants.
  • Industrial Crop: Biomass  Three broad categories: bamboos, resprouting woody plants, and giant grasses. uses include: protein, materials (paper, building materials, fibers, biochar etc.), chemicals (biobased chemicals), energy - biofuels
  • Management: Coppice  Cut to the ground repeatedly - resprouting vigorously. Non-destructive management systems maintaining the soil organic carbon.
  • Regional Crop  These crops have been domesticated and cultivated regionally but have not been adopted elsewhere and are typically not traded globally, Examples in this broad category include perennial cottons and many nuts and staple fruits.

References

Temperature Converter

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The PFAF Bookshop

Plants For A Future have a number of books available in paperback and digital form. Book titles include Edible Plants, Edible Perennials, Edible Trees, and Woodland Gardening. Our new book to be released soon is Edible Shrubs.

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Propagation

Seed - pre-soak for 48 hours in warm water and sow the seed in late winter in a cold frame[80]. A short stratification improves germination rates and time[80]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in the following summer. The seed stores for over 10 years[113]. Suckers taken during the dormant season.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Robinia fertilisBristly LocustShrub2.0 4-8 MLMHNDM00 
Robinia flava Tree0.0 -  LMHSNDM10 
Robinia hispidaBristly locust, Rose-acacia, or Moss locustShrub3.5 4-8 FLMHNDM013
Robinia luxuriansNew Mexico locustTree8.0 4-8  LMHSNDM10 
Robinia pseudoacaciaBlack Locust, Yellow LocustTree25.0 4-9 FLMHNDM324
Robinia viscosaClammy Locust, Hartweg's locustTree13.0 3-7 MLMHSNDM003

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Author

A.Gray.

Botanical References

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