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Rhus verniciflua - (Stokes) F.A. Barkley.

Common Name Lacquer Tree
Family Anacardiaceae
USDA hardiness Coming soon
Known Hazards The plant contains toxic substances that can cause severe irritation to some people[8, 19]. The sap can be particularly caustic[11]. All parts of the plant contain resinous phenolic compounds known as urushiols. Direct contacr with the plant, exposure to smoke or fumes from a burning plant or even contact with pets or animals that have touched the plant can cause severe allergic dermatitis in some individuals. There is usually a latent period of about 12 - 24 hours from the moment of contact, this is followed by a reddening and severe blistering of the skin. Even plant specimens 100 or more years old can cause problems[274].
Habitats Woods and thickets on mountain slopes[109], usually around 1200 metres[64].
Range E. Asia - China, Japan.
Edibility Rating    (0 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (1 of 5)
Care
Half Hardy Moist Soil Full sun
Rhus verniciflua Lacquer Tree


Rhus verniciflua Lacquer Tree

 

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Summary

UPDATE: 22/08/11. This plant was originally in the database as Rhus verniciflua. It has now been changed to Toxicodendron vernicifluum (Stokes) F.A. Barkley as it's accepted name with Rhus verniciflua as a synonym


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of lolypop
Rhus verniciflua is a deciduous Tree growing to 15 m (49ft) by 10 m (32ft).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 9 and is frost tender. It is in flower in July, and the seeds ripen from September to November. The species is dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required). and is pollinated by Bees. The plant is not self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms

Rhus verniciflua. R. kaempferi. R. vernicifera. R. vernix. non L.

Habitats

Woodland Garden Canopy;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Oil.
Edible Uses: Oil.

None known

Medicinal Uses



Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Emmenagogue;  Stimulant;  Tonic;  Vermifuge.

Stimulant, tonic[178]. The leaves are used in the treatment of wasting diseases and internal parasites[218]. The seed is haemostatic and is used in the treatment of dysentery[218]. A resin from the plant is emmenagogue, haemolytic, stimulant, tonic and vermifuge[218]. Some caution is advised in the use of the leaves and stems of this plant, see the notes above on toxicity.

Other Uses

Dye;  Lacquer;  Mordant;  Oil;  Wax.

A non-drying oil is obtained from the fruit and is used in making candles[1, 11, 46, 57, 74, 109]. The fruit contains about 25% fat[218]. The fruit is crushed, heated and then crushed to extract the oil[K]. The oil attains a tallow-like consistency on standing and is used to make candles. These burn brilliantly, though they emit a pungent smoke[4]. The sap can be used as a varnish or a lacquer. It is obtained by incision of the stem[1, 4, 11, 19, 57, 74], which is best done in mid-summer[64]. The lacquer is frequently used in Japanese art, it requires a damp atmosphere in which to dry and harden, a moist cave being ideal[64]. It is resistant to acids, alkalis, alcohol and temperatures up to 70°c[171]. The leaves and galls formed as a result of insect damage are rich in tannin[4]. The leaves can be collected as they fall in the autumn and used as a brown dye or as a mordant[169].

Cultivation details

Succeeds in a well-drained fertile soil in full sun[11, 200]. One report says that this species is only hardy into zone 9 (tolerating only occasional light frosts)[200] but there are large healthy trees at Cambridge and Edinburgh Botanical gardens, and both sites had fruiting trees in September 1989[K]. Plants have brittle branches and these can be broken off in strong winds[200]. Plants are also susceptible to coral spot fungus[11]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. Cultivated for its lacquer in the warmer areas of Japan[58, 109]. Many of the species in this genus, including this one, are highly toxic and can also cause severe irritation to the skin of some people, whilst other species are not poisonous. It is relatively simple to distinguish which is which, the poisonous species have axillary panicles and smooth fruits whilst non-poisonous species have compound terminal panicles and fruits covered with acid crimson hairs[1, 4]. The toxic species are sometimes separated into their own genus, Toxicodendron, by some botanists[200]. Partly dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

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Propagation

Seed - best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Pre-soak the seed for 24 hours in hot water (starting at a temperature of 80 - 90c and allowing it to cool) prior to sowing in order to leach out any germination inhibitors[200]. The stored seed also needs hot water treatment and can be sown in early spring in a cold frame[200]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame[200]. Root cuttings 4cm long taken in December and potted up vertically in a greenhouse. Good percentage[78, 200]. Suckers in late autumn to winter[200].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Rhus x pulvinata 42

 

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Expert comment

Author

(Stokes) F.A. Barkley.

Botanical References

11109200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Angel   Tue Mar 31 2009

Extracto usado como antioxidante

Angel   Tue Mar 31 2009

En este link se encuentra un estudio sobre el efecto de los compuestos de este arbol para tratar los productos AGE que son los principales responsables de los procesos del envejecimiento humano.

Pharmaceutical Society Japan Estracto de la planta y usos en combatir los AGE

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