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Raphanus sativus caudatus - (L.)L.H.Bailey.

Common Name Rat-Tail Radish
Family Brassicaceae or Cruciferae
USDA hardiness 7-10
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Not known in a truly wild situation.
Range This plant's origin is uncertain, it possibly arose out of cultivation[200].
Edibility Rating  
Other Uses  
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Frost Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Raphanus sativus caudatus Rat-Tail Radish


Raphanus sativus caudatus Rat-Tail Radish

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 
Raphanus sativus caudatus is a ANNUAL.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8 and is not frost tender. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms

Part of R. sativa (Cornucopia)

Habitats

Cultivated Beds.

Not known in a truly wild situation.

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers;  Leaves;  Seedpod.
Edible Uses:

Young leaves - raw or cooked[177]. A somewhat hot taste. Flowers - raw. A nice spicy addition to salads. Young seedpods - raw[1, 4, 27, 37]. Crisp and juicy, they must be eaten when young because they quickly become tough and fibrous. They can grow more than 60cm long, but they tend to become tough and fibrous when more than 30cm long[183].

Medicinal Uses



Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Anthelmintic;  Antibacterial;  Antifungal;  Antiscorbutic;  Antispasmodic;  Astringent;  Cancer;  Carminative;  
Cholagogue;  Digestive;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  Laxative;  Poultice;  Stomachic.


Radishes have long been grown as a food crop, but they also have various medicinal actions. The roots stimulate the appetite and digestion, having a tonic and laxative effect upon the intestines and indirectly stimulating the flow of bile[254]. Consuming radish generally results in improved digestion, but some people are sensitive to its acridity and robust action[254]. The plant is used in the treatment of intestinal parasites, though the part of the plant used is not specified[147]. The leaves, seeds and old roots are used in the treatment of asthma and other chest complaints[218]. The juice of the fresh leaves is diuretic and laxative[240]. The seed is carminative, diuretic, expectorant, laxative and stomachic[176, 218, 240]. It is taken internally in the treatment of indigestion, abdominal bloating, wind, acid regurgitation, diarrhoea and bronchitis[238]. The root is antiscorbutic, antispasmodic, astringent, cholagogue, digestive and diuretic[21, 218]. It is crushed and used as a poultice for burns, bruises and smelly feet[218]. Radishes are also an excellent food remedy for stone, gravel and scorbutic conditions[4]. The root is best harvested before the plant flowers[21]. Its use is not recommended if the stomach or intestines are inflamed[21]. The plant contains raphanin, which is antibacterial and antifungal[218, 238]. It inhibits the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, streptococci, Pneumococci etc[176]. The plant also shows anti-tumour activity[218].

Other Uses

Green manure;  Repellent.

The growing plant repels beetles from tomatoes and cucumbers[20, 201]. It is also useful for repelling various other insect pests such as carrot root fly[201]. There is a fodder variety that grows more vigorously and is used as a green manure[87].

Cultivation details

Prefers a rich soil with ample moisture[16, 52]. Dislikes very heavy or acid soils[16, 37]. Plants are susceptible to drought and require irrigation during dry spells in the summer or the root quality will rapidly deteriorate and the plant will go to seed. The rat-tailed radishes are sometimes cultivated for their large edible seedpods, there are some named varieties[183]. This group of radishes does not produce roots of good quality, it is cultivated mainly for the edible young seedpods which are harvested in the summer. Radishes are a good companion plant for lettuces, nasturtiums, peas and chervil, tomatoes and cucumbers[18, 20]. They are said to repel cucumber beetles if planted near cucumber plants and they also repel the vine borers which attack squashes, marrows and courgettes[238]. They grow badly with hyssop[18, 20] and with grape vines[201].

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in situ. Germination should take place within 2 weeks.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Raphanus landraRadish20
Raphanus maritimaSea Radish20
Raphanus raphanistrumWild Radish21
Raphanus sativusRadish, Cultivated radish43
Raphanus sativus nigerOriental Radish43
Raphanus sativus oleiformisFodder Radish33

 

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Author

(L.)L.H.Bailey.

Botanical References

200

Links / References

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Subject : Raphanus sativus caudatus  
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