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Populus x canadensis - Moench.

Common Name Canadian Poplar, Carolina Poplar
Family Salicaceae
USDA hardiness 4-9
Known Hazards None known
Habitats A group of naturally occurring hybrids between P. nigra and P. deltoidea[11].
Range N. America.
Edibility Rating    (0 of 5)
Other Uses    (3 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (1 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full sun
Populus x canadensis Canadian Poplar, Carolina Poplar


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Populus x canadensis Canadian Poplar, Carolina Poplar
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Summary

Bloom Color: Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Form: Oval.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of lolypop
Populus x canadensis is a deciduous Tree growing to 40 m (131ft) by 12 m (39ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 4. The species is dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required). and is pollinated by Wind. The plant is not self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

P. x. euramericana.

Habitats

Woodland Garden Canopy;

Edible Uses

None known

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Anodyne  Antiinflammatory  Febrifuge

Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, the bark of most, if not all members of the genus contain salicin, a glycoside that probably decomposes into salicylic acid (aspirin) in the body[213, 238]. The bark is therefore anodyne, anti-inflammatory and febrifuge. It is used especially in treating rheumatism and fevers, and also to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps[238].

References

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FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

Rooting hormone  Shelterbelt  Wood

An extract of the shoots can be used as a rooting hormone for all types of cuttings. It is extracted by soaking the chopped up shoots in cold water for a day[172]. A fast-growing and wind resistant tree, it can be used in a shelterbelt planting[11, 200]. In more exposed sites there is some wind-pruning[11]. The tree is late coming into leaf and so often escapes the spring storms[11]. Wood - soft, rather woolly in texture, without smell or taste, of low flammability, not durable, very resistant to abrasion[11]. Wood - soft, moderately strong, easily worked, rather woolly in texture, without smell or taste, of low flammability, not durable, very resistant to abrasion[11]. Used in making the staves of barrels and woodenware, it turns well. It makes an excellent fuel[99].

Special Uses

Food Forest

References

Cultivation details

A very easily grown plant, it does well in a heavy cold damp soil[1]. Prefers a deep rich well-drained circumneutral soil, growing best in the south and east of Britain[11, 200]. Growth is much less on wet soils, on poor acid soils and on thin dry soils[11]. This species is fairly wind resistant, though it does not do well in exposed upland sites[11]. It dislikes shade and is intolerant of root or branch competition[200]. A very fast growing tree, it grows for a longer period in the season than other poplars. This hybrid species contains a number of named forms, several of which have been selected for their ornamental value[11, 200]. Many of them are fast growing trees that are used in forestry and for shelterbelts[11, 200]. 'Serotina' and 'Robusta', in particular, are often used in shelter belt plantings. 'Serotina' is a male that responds well to pollarding but is slower in growth than some other cultivars[11]. 'Robusta' is a male and is frequently grown in forestry, as a screen and in shelterbelts[11]. The var. 'Regenerata' is tolerant of urban pollution[200]. Poplars have very extensive and aggressive root systems that can invade and damage drainage systems. Especially when grown on clay soils, they should not be planted within 12 metres of buildings since the root system can damage the building's foundations by drying out the soil[11]. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[200]. Special Features: Not North American native, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.

References

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Propagation

Seed - must be sown as soon as it is ripe in spring[113]. Poplar seed has an extremely short period of viability and needs to be sown within a few days of ripening[200]. Surface sow or just lightly cover the seed in trays in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the cold frame. If sufficient growth is made, it might be possible to plant them out in late summer into their permanent positions, otherwise keep them in the cold frame until the following late spring and then plant them out. Most poplar species hybridize freely with each other, so the seed may not come true unless it is collected from the wild in areas with no other poplar species growing[11]. This species is a hybrid and will not come true from seed. Cuttings of mature wood of the current season's growth, 20 - 40cm long, November/December in a sheltered outdoor bed or direct into their permanent positions. Very easy. Suckers in early spring[78].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Subject : Populus x canadensis  
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