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Picea - (Gordon.&Glend.)Lindl. ex Hildebrand.

Common Name Colorado Fir, White fir
Family Pinaceae
USDA hardiness 3-7
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Found on a wide range of soils, but preferring moist soils with a humid climate and a long winter from 700 metres to 3,400 metres[229].
Range South-western N. America - Oregon to California, to Arizona and New Mexico.
Edibility Rating    (0 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (2 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Full shade Semi-shade Full sun
Picea Colorado Fir, White fir


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Wsiegmund
Picea Colorado Fir, White fir

 

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Summary

Form: Columnar.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of cone
Picea is an evergreen Tree growing to 45 m (147ft) by 8 m (26ft) at a fast rate.
See above for USDA hardiness. It is hardy to UK zone 4 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf all year, in flower in April, and the seeds ripen from September to October. The species is monoecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant) and is pollinated by Wind.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay and nutritionally poor soils. Suitable pH: mildly acid and neutral soils. It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Picea concolor.

Habitats

Edible Uses

None known

References   More on Edible Uses

Medicinal Uses

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The pitch from the trunk has been used as an antiseptic poultice for cuts, wounds etc[257]. An infusion of the pitch, or the bark, has been used in the treatment of TB[257] An infusion of the foliage has been used in a bath for relieving rheumatism[257]. An infusion of the pitch and leaves has been used in the treatment of pulmonary complaints[257].

References   More on Medicinal Uses

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FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

A tan coloured dye can be obtained from the bark[257]. Wood - very light, not strong, coarse grained, soft, not durable. Used mainly for pulp, cases etc[46, 61, 82]. It is sometimes used in framing small houses but is not strong enough to be used in larger buildings[229]. The wood lacks a distinctive odour and so does not impart a flavour to items stored in it. Thus it can be used for making tubs for storing food items[229].

Special Uses

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

Landscape Uses:Christmas tree, Firewood, Pest tolerant, Screen, Specimen. Prefers a good moist but not water-logged soil[1]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Plants are very shade tolerant but growth is slower in dense shade[81]. Intolerant of atmospheric pollution[1]. Prefers slightly acid conditions down to a pH of about 5[200]. Prefers growing on a north-facing slope[200]. Trees succeed on poor dry sites in the wild[155]. Trees are shallow rooted and therefore liable to be wind-blown in exposed sites[155]. Trees grow almost as well in S. Britain as they do in cooler areas of the country[11]. They are at their best in the Perthshire valleys of Scotland and in N.E. England, trees in the south and east of the country tend to be thin in the crown and soon lose their shape. Trees in the west grow better but also lose their shape after a while[11, 185]. New growth is from mid-May to July and trees are virtually never damaged by late frosts or aphis[1, 185]. Most trees of this species that are grown in Britain are in fact the sub-species A. concolor lowiana. (Gordon.)Lemmon. This form tends to grow better in Britain than the type. There are 2 basic forms of this sub-species, those from the north of the range are vigorous in height growth whilst the southern form is vigorous in girth growth[185]. They both have a potential for forestry use in Britain[185]. Trees should be planted into their permanent positions when they are quite small, between 30 and 90cm in height. Larger trees will check badly and hardly put on any growth for several years. This also badly affects root development and wind resistance[200]. Plants are strongly outbreeding, self-fertilized seed usually grows poorly[200]. They hybridize freely with other members of this genus[200]. A very ornamental tree[1]. The crushed leaves have a strong lemony scent[185]. Special Features:Attractive foliage, North American native, Fragrant foliage, There are no flowers or blooms.

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

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Propagation

Seed - sow early February in a greenhouse or outdoors in March[78]. Germination is often poor, usually taking about 6 - 8 weeks[78]. Stratification is said to produce a more even germination so it is probably best to sow the seed in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the autumn[80, 113]. The seed remains viable for up to 5 years if it is well stored[113]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on for at least their first winter in pots. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Alternatively, if you have sufficient seed, it is possible to sow in an outdoor seedbed. One report says that it is best to grow the seedlings on in the shade at a density of about 550 plants per square metre[78] whilst another report says that they are best grown on in a sunny position[80].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Picea abiesNorway SpruceTree30.0 2-7 FLMHNMWe214
Picea asperataChinese SpruceTree40.0 - MLMHNDM20 
Picea brachytylaSargent SpruceTree40.0 7-10 FLMHNM20 
Picea brewerianaWeeping Spruce, Brewer spruceTree15.0 5-9 SLMHNM20 
Picea engelmanniiMountain Spruce, Engelmann spruceTree20.0 3-7 MLMHNMWe22 
Picea glaucaWhite Spruce, Black Hills Spruce, Canadian SpruceTree15.0 2-6 FLMHNMWe223
Picea glehniiSakhalin SpruceTree30.0 4-7 FLMHNMWe20 
Picea jezoensisYezo SpruceTree35.0 - MLMHNM21 
Picea marianaBlack Spruce, Swamp SpruceTree20.0 3-5 SLMHNMWe22 
Picea omorikaSerbian SpruceTree25.0 4-7 FLMHNMWe20 
Picea orientalisCaucasian SpruceTree20.0 4-7 FLMHSNM20 
Picea pungensBlue Spruce, Colorado SpruceTree20.0 3-7 MLMHNDM20 
Picea purpureaPurple-Coned SpruceTree45.0 4-7 MLMHNM20 
Picea rubensRed SpruceTree30.0 6-7 FLMHNM21 
Picea sitchensisSitka SpruceTree50.0 6-7 FLMHNMWe22 
Picea smithianaMorinda SpruceTree30.0 6-9 SLMHNM20 

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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(Gordon.&Glend.)Lindl. ex Hildebrand.

Botanical References

1160200

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