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Iris_pseudacorus - L.

Common Name Yellow Flag, Paleyellow iris
Family Iridaceae
USDA hardiness 5-8
Known Hazards The leaves, and especially the rhizomes, of this species contain an irritating resinous substance called irisin. If ingested this can cause severe gastric disturbances[274]. Plants can cause skin irritations and allergies in some people[238].
Habitats Damp marshy areas, swampy woods and in shallow water or wet ground on the edges of rivers and ditches[17]. Often found in shady places[4].
Range Europe, including Britain, from Norway south and east to N. Africa the Caucasus and W. Asia.
Edibility Rating    (1 of 5)
Other Uses    (2 of 5)
Weed Potential Yes
Medicinal Rating    (2 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Wet Soil Water Plants Semi-shade Full sun
Iris_pseudacorus Yellow Flag, Paleyellow iris


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Illustration_Iris_pseudacorus0.jpg
Iris_pseudacorus Yellow Flag, Paleyellow iris
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Summary

Bloom Color: Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Late summer, Mid summer. Form: Spreading or horizontal, Upright or erect, Variable spread.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Iris_pseudacorus is a PERENNIAL growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 2 m (6ft) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to July. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, hoverflies. The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist or wet soil and can grow in water. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Edible Uses

The seed is said to make an excellent coffee substitute as long as it is well roasted[2, 7, 61, 105, 115, 244]. Caution is advised, it might be poisonous[177].

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


The fresh root is astringent, cathartic, emetic, emmenagogue and odontalgic[4, 7, 61]. A slice of the root held against an aching tooth is said to bring immediate relief[244]. It was at one time widely used as a powerful cathartic but is seldom used nowadays because of its extremely acrid nature[4]. It can also cause violent vomiting and diarrhoea[244]. When dried the root loses its acridity and then only acts as an astringent[4].

References

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An important new book from PFAF. It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. The book suggests that community and small-scale food forests can provide a real alternative to intensive industrialised agriculture, and help to combat the many inter-related environmental crises that threaten the very future of life on Earth.

Read More

FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

A beautiful yellow dye is obtained from the flowers[4]. A good black dye is obtained from the root if it is mixed with iron sulphate[4, 115]. It is brown otherwise[141]. The root is a source of tannin[61] and has been used in making ink[4]. A delicately scented essential oil, obtained from the roots, has been used to adulterate the oil of Acorus calamus[245].

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

Landscape Uses:Container, Specimen. Prefers a humus rich soil[79]. Succeeds in water up to 15cm deep[24]. Requires a moist soil, especially in early summer. Prefers a position in semi-shade[188]. Plants can be grown in quite coarse grass, which can be cut annually in the autumn[233]. A delicately scented essential oil is obtained from the dried roots[245]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits[233]. Some named forms have been selected for their ornamental value[187]. Special Features: Attractive foliage, Not North American native, Invasive, Naturalizing, All or parts of this plant are poisonous, Wetlands plant, Attracts butterflies, Suitable for cut flowers. In garden design, as well as the above-ground architecture of a plant, root structure considerations help in choosing plants that work together for their optimal soil requirements including nutrients and water. The root pattern is rhizomatous with underground stems sending roots and shoots along their length [2-1].

References

Temperature Converter

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Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame[4]. Stored seed should be sown as early in the year as possible in a cold frame. A period of cold stratification improves germination time and rates. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the greenhouse or cold frame for their first year. Plant out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Division in March or October. Early autumn is best[200]. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Yellow Flag, Paleyellow iris, Iris, Yellow iris

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Iris pseudacorusYellow Flag, Paleyellow irisPerennial1.5 5-8 MLMSNMWeWa122

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Botanical References

17200

Links / References

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Readers comment

d g shrubb   Wed Dec 3 2008

Is there any herbicide that willkill this invasive plant

   Apr 19 2015 12:00AM

This plant is considered very invasive where I live and forms dense stands. The main problem seems to be that they trap sediment and/or build soil very rapidly which alters watercourses and drainage patterns. However, they are known to absorb heavy metals (which are also abundant in the water where I live)... Although the heavy metals still exist within the plants and are still harmful if the plant dies and releases them... but having dense stands of this plant in urban areas is essentially like having a landfill: it is space that is used for storing toxins in high concentrations so that the surrounding areas are toxin-free. As long as the heavy metals are stored in living Yellow Flag Iris then there are less around to make it into my garden and drinking water. Make of it what you will, but I personally think these should be allowed to exist wherever there are heavy metal problems (all urban areas).

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