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Hibiscus boryanus - L.

Common Name Chinese Hibiscus, Shoeblackplant, Hawaiian Hibiscus, Tropical Hibiscus, China Rose, Rose-of-China, S
Family Malvaceae
USDA hardiness 9-11
Known Hazards Do not use during pregnancy or if planning children.
Habitats Not known in a truly wild situation
Range S. E. Asia.
Edibility Rating    (3 of 5)
Other Uses    (3 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (3 of 5)
Care (info)
Half Hardy Moist Soil Full sun
Hibiscus boryanus Chinese Hibiscus, Shoeblackplant, Hawaiian Hibiscus, Tropical Hibiscus, China Rose, Rose-of-China, S


http://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Palamède&action=edit&redlink=1
Hibiscus boryanus Chinese Hibiscus, Shoeblackplant, Hawaiian Hibiscus, Tropical Hibiscus, China Rose, Rose-of-China, S

 

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Summary

Bloom Color: Orange, Pink, Red, Salmon, White, Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early summer, Early spring, Late summer, Late spring, Mid summer, Mid spring. Form: Oval, Vase.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of shrub
Hibiscus boryanus is an evergreen Shrub growing to 2.5 m (8ft) by 2.5 m (8ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 9 and is frost tender. It is in leaf all year. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Hibiscus boryanus. Hibiscus festalis. Hibiscus storckii

Habitats

Edible Uses

Young leaves are sometimes used as a spinach substitute[177, 183]. A nutritional analysis is available[218]. Flowers - raw or cooked[240]. They can also be made into a kind of pickle or used as a purple dye for colouring foods such as preserved fruits and cooked vegetables[177, 183]. A nutritional analysis is available[218]. Root - it is edible but very fibrousy[144]. Mucilaginous, without very much flavour[144].

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


Chinese hibiscus is a sweet, astringent, cooling herb that checks bleeding, soothes irritated tissues and relaxes spasms[238]. The flowers are aphrodisiac, demulcent, emmenagogue, emollient and refrigerant[240]. They are used internally in the treatment of excessive and painful menstruation, cystitis, venereal diseases, feverish illnesses, bronchial catarrh, coughs and to promote hair growth[238, 240]. An infusion of the flowers is given as a cooling drink to ill people[272]. The leaves are anodyne, aperient, emollient and laxative[240]. A decoction is used as a lotion in the treatment of fevers[240]. The leaves and flowers are beaten into a paste and poulticed onto cancerous swellings and mumps[218]. The flowers are used in the treatment of carbuncles, mumps, fever and sores[218]. The root is a good source of mucilage and is used as a substitute for marsh mallow (Althaea officinalis) in the treatment of coughs and colds[240, 272]. A paste made from the root is used in the treament of venereal diseases[272].

References

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Edible Shrubs provides detailed information, attractively presented, on over 70 shrub species. They have been selected to provide a mix of different plant sizes and growing conditions. Most provide delicious and nutritious fruit, but many also have edible leaves, seeds, flowers, stems or roots, or they yield edible or useful oil.

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Edible Shrubs Book

Other Uses

The juice from the petals is used in China as shoe-blacking and mascara[238]. A dye is made from the petals[272]. A good quality fibre is obtained from the stems[74]. In warm sub-tropical areas the fibres can be up to 3 metres long, but in Britain they are likely to be much shorter. The fibre is used for coarse fabrics, nets and paper[74]. Plants are often used for hedges and screens, though since they are not very cold hardy they are not suitable for this use in Britain[200].

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

Landscape Uses:Border, Container, Hedge, Standard, Seashore, Specimen. Prefers a well-drained humus rich fertile soil in a warm, sheltered position in full sun[200, 260]. A very ornamental plant[1], it is not very frost-tolerant and needs to be grown in essentially frost-free areas. It might succeed outdoors in the very mildest areas of the country if given a very sheltered warm position. Alternatively, it might be possible to grow the plant as a tender annual by starting it off early in a warm greenhouse. If well-grown it can flower and set seed in its first year. This species grows very well in a frost-free conservatory in Northern Europe so long as it is in a sunny position and free from draughts[260]. Plants will often lose most of their leaves in cool winters, though they will normally regenerate quickly as the warmer weather returns[260]. The flowers of Chinese hibiscus are very important in Hindu devotional ceremonies, being sacred to the Elephant God, Ganesh[238]. Individual flowers are short-lived, in many modern cultivars the flowers wither after 24 hours though in many of the older cultivars they can last for 48 hours[260]. There are many named forms, selected for their ornamental value[200]. Special Features:Attracts birds, Not North American native, Attracts butterflies, Blooms are very showy.

References

Temperature Converter

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The PFAF Bookshop

Plants For A Future have a number of books available in paperback and digital form. Book titles include Edible Plants, Edible Perennials, Edible Trees, and Woodland Gardening. Our new book to be released soon is Edible Shrubs.

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Propagation

Seed - sow early spring in a warm greenhouse. Germination is usually fairly rapid. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. If growing them as annuals, plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer and protect them with a frame or cloche until they are growing away well. If hoping to grow them as perennials, then it is better to grow them on in the greenhouse for their first year and to plant them out in early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Overwinter them in a warm greenhouse and plant out after the last expected frosts.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Amapola, Aute samoa, Bup, Bunga raya, Bunga sepatu, Bussouge, Cha-baa, Chaba, Chembarathi, Chinese rose, Clavelon, Dam but, Dasavala, Dasindacha phula, Fasut jasum, Fu sang, Ghanti phul, Gugamela, Gumamela bulaklak, Japa, Jasavanda, Jasum, Jasut, Jasuva, Java pushpamu dasana, Java, Joba, Karibunamidi, Khaung-yan, Khaung-yan-ywet-hla, Kembang sepatu, Kembang sepatu mawar cina, Linyolo, Losi, Mamela, Mandaro, Mawkmnae, Pan-swe-le, Phurahong, Pushpam, Rooj, Rosa, Rudra, Saimaa, Sapattu mal, Semparuthi, Shoe flower, Te roti, Thelele, Vadamal, Watha wal,

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Africa, Antigua and Barbuda, Asia, Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Burkina Faso, Central Africa, Central America, China*, Congo, Costa Rica, East Africa, East Timor, France, Ghana, Greece, Guiana, Guianas, Guyana, Haiti, Hawaii, India, Indochina, Indonesia, Italy, Kiribati, Laos, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Marquesas, Marshall Islands, Mediterranean, Micronesia, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, Pacific, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, PNG, Philippines, Pohnpei, Portugal, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, SE Asia, Sierra Leone, South America, Spain, Sri Lanka, St. Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, Suriname, Taiwan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, USA, Vanuatu, Vietnam, West Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe,

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Author

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Botanical References

74200266

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