Now available: PLANTS FOR YOUR FOOD FOREST: an important new book from PFAF. It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. The book suggests that community and small-scale food forests can provide a real alternative to intensive industrialised agriculture, and help to combat the many inter-related environmental crises that threaten the very future of life on Earth. More >>>

Follow Us:

 

Gentiana crassicaulis - Duthie. ex Burkill.

Common Name
Family Gentianaceae
USDA hardiness 7-10
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Damp patches in mountainous regions[239]. Wastelands, grasslands, roadside slopes, alpine meadows, scrub, forest margins and forests at elevations of 2100 - 4500 metres[266].
Range E. Asia - W. China.
Edibility Rating    (0 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (3 of 5)
Care (info)
Frost Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Gentiana crassicaulis


Gentiana crassicaulis

 

Translate this page:

Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Gentiana crassicaulis is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.4 m (1ft 4in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8. It is in flower in August, and the seeds ripen in September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bumblebees, butterflies.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

 Cultivated Beds;

Edible Uses

None known

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Analgesic  Antiinflammatory  Antipyretic  Antirheumatic  Diuretic  Hypotensive

The roots of gentian species contain some of the most bitter compounds known and make an excellent tonic for the whole digestive system, working especially on the stomach, liver and gall bladder[238]. The root is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antirheumatic, diuretic, febrifuge, hypoglycaemic and hypotensive[176, 218, 238]. The root is used internally in the treatment of arthritis, allergic inflammations, low-grade fever in chronic diseases, jaundice and hepatitis[176, 218, 238]. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use.

References

Now available: PLANTS FOR YOUR FOOD FOREST: 500 Plants for Temperate Food Forests and Permaculture Gardens.

An important new book from PFAF. It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. The book suggests that community and small-scale food forests can provide a real alternative to intensive industrialised agriculture, and help to combat the many inter-related environmental crises that threaten the very future of life on Earth.

Read More

FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

In general, gentians require a moist well-drained soil in a sheltered position, a certain minimum of atmospheric humidity, high light intensity but a site where temperatures are not too high[239]. They are therefore more difficult to grow in areas with hot summers and in such a region they appreciate some protection from the strongest sunlight[200, 239]. Most species will grow well in the rock garden[200]. This species is easily grown in most soils and usually produces an abundance of fertile seed[239]. A moisture loving plant, preferring to grow with full exposure to the sun but with plenty of underground moisture in the summer, it grows better in the north and west of Britain[1]. This species is not very hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c[200]. Closely related to G. tibetica[266]. Plants are intolerant of root disturbance[200].

References

Temperature Converter

Type a value in the Celsius field to convert the value to Fahrenheit:

Fahrenheit:

image

The PFAF Bookshop

Plants For A Future have a number of books available in paperback and digital form. Book titles include Edible Plants, Edible Perennials, Edible Trees, and Woodland Gardening. Our new book to be released soon is Edible Shrubs.

Shop Now

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a light position in a cold frame[200]. It can also be sown in late winter or early spring but the seed germinates best if given a period of cold stratification and quickly loses viability when stored, with older seed germinating slowly and erratically[200, 239]. It is advantageous to keep the seed at about 10°c for a few days after sowing, to enable the seed to imbibe moisture[239]. Following this with a period of at least 5 - 6 weeks with temperatures falling to between 0 and -5°c will usually produce reasonable germination[239]. It is best to use clay pots, since plastic ones do not drain so freely and the moister conditions encourage the growth of moss, which will prevent germination of the seed[239]. The seed should be surface-sown, or only covered with a very light dressing of compost. The seed requires dark for germination, so the pots should be covered with something like newspaper or be kept in the dark[239]. Pot up the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow on in light shade in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. The seedlings grow on very slowly, taking 2 - 7 years to reach flowering size[239]. When the plants are of sufficient size, place them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Division in March[111]. Most members of this genus have either a single tap-root, or a compact root system united in a single root head, and are thus unsuitable for division[239]. Cuttings of basal shoots in late spring[238].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Blackstonia perfoliataYellow WortAnnual0.5 -  LMNDM00 
Centaurium erythraeaCentaury - Feverwort, European centauryAnnual/Biennial0.3 0-0  LMSNDM13 
Centaurium spicatumSpiked centauryAnnual/Biennial0.6 0-0  LMSNDM01 
Fagraea fragransIronwood, TembusuTree25.0 10-12 SLMHNMWe024
Frasera caroliniensisAmerican ColumboPerennial2.5 0-0  LMSNM02 
Frasera speciosaGreen Gentian, ElkweedBiennial/Perennial1.5 3-7  LMSNM12 
Gentiana acaulisGentianPerennial0.1 3-7 SLMHSNM03 
Gentiana andrewsiiClosed Bottle Gentian, Dakota gentianPerennial0.6 5-9  LMHSNM03 
Gentiana cruciata Perennial0.4 -  LMHSNM12 
Gentiana dahurica Perennial0.3 4-8  LMHSNM03 
Gentiana decumbens Perennial0.3 4-8  LMHSNM01 
Gentiana kurroo Perennial0.2 6-9  LMHSNM03 
Gentiana luteaYellow GentianPerennial1.2 4-8  LMHSNM15 
Gentiana macrophyllaQin JiaoPerennial0.6 5-9  LMHSNM13 
Gentiana manshurica Perennial0.3 -  LMHSNM03 
Gentiana pannonica Perennial0.6 4-8  LMHSNM13 
Gentiana pneumonantheMarsh GentianPerennial0.3 -  LMHSNM02 
Gentiana puberulentaDowny gentianPerennial0.4 5-9  LMHSNM03 
Gentiana punctataSpotted GentianPerennial0.6 4-8  LMHSNM13 
Gentiana purpurea Perennial0.6 4-8  LMHSNM13 
Gentiana saponariaHarvestbellsPerennial0.8 4-8  LMHSNMWe03 
Gentiana scabraLong Dan CaoPerennial0.3 4-8  LMHSNM13 
Gentiana scabra buergeri Perennial0.5 4-8  LMHSNM13 
Gentiana straminea Perennial0.3 4-8  LMHSNM03 
Gentiana thunbergii Annual/Biennial0.2 -  LMHSNM12 
Gentiana triflora Perennial0.5 4-8  LMHSNM02 
Gentiana tubiflora Perennial0.1 5-9  LMHSNM02 
Gentianella amarellaFelwort, Autumn dwarf gentianBiennial0.3 0-0  LMHSNM03 
Gentianella diemensis Annual/Perennial0.3 -  LMHSNM01 
12

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

Print Friendly and PDF

Expert comment

Author

Duthie. ex Burkill.

Botanical References

200266

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Add a comment

If you have important information about this plant that may help other users please add a comment or link below. Only comments or links that are felt to be directly relevant to a plant will be included. If you think a comment/link or information contained on this page is inaccurate or misleading we would welcome your feedback at admin@pfaf.org. If you have questions about a plant please use the Forum on this website as we do not have the resources to answer questions ourselves.

* Please note: the comments by website users are not necessarily those held by PFAF and may give misleading or inaccurate information.

To leave a comment please Register or login here All comments need to be approved so will not appear immediately.

Subject : Gentiana crassicaulis  
© 2010, Plants For A Future. Plants For A Future is a charitable company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales. Charity No. 1057719, Company No. 3204567. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some information cannot be used for commercial reasons or be modified (but some can). Please view the copyright link for more information.
Web Design & Management