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Eucalyptus coccifera - Hook.f.

Common Name Mt. Wellington Peppermint
Family Myrtaceae
USDA hardiness 7-10
Known Hazards Citronellal, an essential oil found in most Eucalyptus species is reported to be mutagenic when used in isolation[269]. In large doses, oil of eucalyptus, like so many essential oils has caused fatalities from intestinal irritation[269]. Death is reported from ingestion of 4 - 24 ml of essential oils, but recoveries are also reported for the same amount[269]. Symptoms include gastroenteric burning and irritation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, oxygen deficiency, ,weakness, dizziness, stupor, difficult respiration, delirium, paralysis, convulsions, and death, usually due to respiratory failure[269].
Habitats Mountains to 1200 metres[77].
Range Australia - Tasmania.
Edibility Rating    (0 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care
Frost Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Wet Soil Full sun
Eucalyptus coccifera Mt. Wellington Peppermint


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Noodle_snacks
Eucalyptus coccifera Mt. Wellington Peppermint
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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of cone
Eucalyptus coccifera is an evergreen Tree growing to 15 m (49ft) by 6 m (19ft) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees.
It is noted for attracting wildlife.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry moist or wet soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Canopy; Secondary; Bog Garden;

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known

Other Uses

Dye;  Fuel.

Olive-green and gold dyes are obtained from the leaves[168]. An excellent fuel, it is similar in quality to ash, Fraxinus excelsior[107].

Cultivation details

Prefers a sunny position in a moderately fertile well-drained moisture retentive circum-neutral soil[200]. Tolerates poor soils, especially those low in mineral elements[200]. Tolerates dry soils and also drought once it is established. A very wind hardy tree[1, 49, 75], tolerating salt-laden winds[200]. Plants are very frost resistant[49, 77], tolerating long periods down to -10°c and short periods down to -16°c[200]. Eucalyptus species have not adopted a deciduous habit and continue to grow until it is too cold for them to do so. This makes them more susceptible to damage from sudden cold snaps. If temperature fluctuations are more gradual, as in a woodland for example, the plants have the opportunity to stop growing and become dormant, thus making them more cold resistant[200]. A deep mulch around the roots to prevent the soil from freezing also helps the trees to survive cold conditions. The members of this genus are remarkably adaptable however, there can be a dramatic increase in the hardiness of subsequent generations from the seed of survivors growing in temperate zones[200]. A very ornamental tree, it grows very well in Britain as far north as the west of Scotland[11]. The leaves are extremely aromatic[245]. Plants are shallow-rooting and, especially in windy areas, should be planted out into their permanent positions when small to ensure that they do not suffer from wind-rock[245]. They strongly resent root disturbance and should be container grown before planting out into their permanent position[11]. Plants are subject to 'silver leaf' disease[107]. Eucalyptus monocultures are an environmental disaster, they are voracious, allelopathic and encourage the worst possible attitudes to land use and conservation[200]. The flowers are rich in nectar and are a good bee crop[200].

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Propagation

Seed - surface sow February/March in a sunny position in a greenhouse[11, 78, 134]. Species that come from high altitudes appreciate 6 - 8 weeks cold stratification at 2°c[200]. Pot up the seedlings into individual pots as soon as the second set of seed leaves has developed, if left longer than this they might not move well. Plant out into their permanent positions in early summer and give them some protection from the cold in their first winter. The seed can also be sown in June, the young trees being planted in their final positions in late spring of the following year. The seed has a long viability[200].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Corymbia citriodoraLemon-Scented Gum, blue spotted gum, lemon eucalyptus, eucalyptus citriodora.23
Eucalyptus caesiaGungurru20
Eucalyptus camaldulensisRed River Gum, Murray Red Gum, River Red Eucalyptus13
Eucalyptus citriodoraLemon-Scented Gum, Lemon Scented Eucalyptus13
Eucalyptus dumosaWater Mallee10
Eucalyptus globulusTasmanian Blue Gum, Eurabbie, Blue Gum, Blue Eucalyptus14
Eucalyptus grandisFlooded Gum, Gum, Rose Eucalyptus02
Eucalyptus gummiferaRed Bloodwood13
Eucalyptus gunniiCider Gum33
Eucalyptus johnstoniiYellow Gum, Johnston's gum00
Eucalyptus largiflorensBlack Box10
Eucalyptus leucoxylonYellow Gum, White ironbark, White Eucalyptus10
Eucalyptus macrorhynchaRed Stringybark13
Eucalyptus melliodoraYellow Box00
Eucalyptus microcorysTallow Wood, Australian tallowwood00
Eucalyptus microthecaCoolabah, Coolibah, Flooded Box, Coolibah20
Eucalyptus obliquaMessmate00
Eucalyptus paucifloraCabbage Gum, Snow gum00
Eucalyptus pauciflora niphophilaSnow Gum03
Eucalyptus perrinianaSpinning Gum00
Eucalyptus piperitaSydney Peppermint02
Eucalyptus polybracteaBlue Mallee13
Eucalyptus punctataGrey Gum10
Eucalyptus racemosaSnappy Gum03
Eucalyptus regnansMountain Ash00
Eucalyptus robustaSwamp Mahogany, Eucalyptus Gum03
Eucalyptus sideroxylonRed Ironbark, Eucalyptus, Gum, Pink Ironbark00
Eucalyptus tereticornisForest Red Gum22
Eucalyptus urophyllaTimor White Gum00
12

 

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Hook.f.

Botanical References

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Readers comment

John Worsley   Mon Dec 4 2006

I have just had a large eucalptus tree fall down in my garden. Luckily it die very little damage. Before taking a chain saw to this magnificent tree (probably 60/70 ft tall) I wondered if it had any value as furniture wood, or any other use?

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Subject : Eucalyptus coccifera  
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