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Dryopteris barbigera - Moore.

Common Name
Family Dryopteridaceae
USDA hardiness Coming soon
Known Hazards Although we have found no reports for this species, a number of ferns contain carcinogens so some caution is advisable[200]. The fresh plant contains thiaminase, an enzyme that robs the body of its vitamin B complex. In small quantities this enzyme will do no harm to people eating an adequate diet that is rich in vitamin B, though large quantities can cause severe health problems. The enzyme is destroyed by heat or thorough drying, so cooking the plant will remove the thiaminase[172]. However, there have been reports for other species of ferns suggesting that even cooked fronds can have a long term harmful effect. Some caution is therefore advised.
Habitats Not known
Range E. Asia - Himalayas in the Alpine zone from Kashmir to Sikkim.
Edibility Rating    (0 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (4 of 5)
Care (info)
Moist Soil Semi-shade
Dryopteris barbigera


Dryopteris barbigera

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 
Dryopteris barbigera is a FERN.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: mildly acid and neutral soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil and can tolerate drought.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;

Edible Uses

None known

References   More on Edible Uses

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Vermifuge

The root contains about 2.1% ‘filicin’[240], a substance that paralyses tapeworms and other internal parasites and has been used as a worm expellent[238, 240]. It is one of the most effective treatments known for tapeworms - its use should be immediately followed by a non-oily purgative such as magnesium sulphate in order to expel the worms from the body[238]. An oily purge, such as caster oil, increases the absorption of the fern root and can be dangerous[238]. The root is harvested in the autumn and can be dried for later use, it should not be stored for longer than 12 months[238]. This remedy should be used with caution and only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner[238]. The root is toxic and the dosage is critical[238]. See also the notes above on toxicity.

References   More on Medicinal Uses

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FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by the plants native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers an acid to neutral soil, succeeding in ordinary fertile soil in a shady position[175, 200]. Prefers a moist soil[188], but is drought tolerant when established[200]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233].

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

Temperature Converter

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Propagation

Spores - can be sown at any time of the year in a greenhouse. Surface sow on a sterilised compost and keep moist, possibly by placing the pot in a plastic bag. Germinates in 1 - 3 months at 20°c. Pot up small clumps of the plants when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a shady part of the greenhouse until large enough to plant out. Division in spring. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Dryopteris blandfordii Fern0.0 -  LMHSM04 
Dryopteris carthusianaNarrow Buckler Fern, Spinulose woodfernFern1.0 6-8 MLMHSMWe24 
Dryopteris crassirhizomaCrown Wood-FernFern1.0 5-9  LMHSM14 
Dryopteris cristataCrested Wood FernFern0.5 4-8  LMHSM04 
Dryopteris dilatataShield FernFern1.2 4-8  LMHSM24 
Dryopteris expansaSpiny Wood Fern, Spreading woodfernFern0.4 3-7  LMHFSM23 
Dryopteris filix-masMale FernFern1.2 3-8 MLMHSDM24 
Dryopteris fragransFragrant WoodfernFern0.2 3-7  LMHSM10 
Dryopteris marginalisMarginal Woodfern, Leather Wood FernFern0.8 3-8 MLMHSM040
Dryopteris odontoloma Fern0.0 -  LMHSM04 
Dryopteris oreadesMountain Male FernFern0.6 5-9  LMHSM04 
Dryopteris schimperiana Fern0.0 -  LMHSM04 
Dryopteris sieboldii Fern0.5 7-10  LMHSM10 
Gymnocarpium dryopterisNorthern oak fernFern0.3 2-7 SLMFSMWe003

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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