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Crocus cancellatus - Herb.

Common Name
Family Iridaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Rocky hillsides and open woods, to 1800 metres[50].
Range N. Africa to W. Asia - N. Palestine to Armenia.
Edibility Rating    (1 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full sun
Crocus cancellatus


Crocus cancellatus

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Crocus cancellatus is a CORM growing to 0.1 m (0ft 4in) by 0.1 m (0ft 4in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf from March to July, in flower from September to November, and the seeds ripen from March to May. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, butterflies.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

C. edulis.

Habitats

Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Cultivated Beds;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Root
Edible Uses:

Corm - cooked[89]. Used when the bulb is sprouting, it is prized as a vegetable[2].

References

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


None known

References

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FOOD FOREST PLANTS

Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References

Cultivation details

Grows best on a gritty well-drained slope[42]. Plants succeed outdoors if they are given perfect drainage in a warm sunny position[200], otherwise they are better grown in a bulb frame[90]. Bulbs should be planted 5 - 7cm deep in the soil[79]. June is the best time to do this[245]. This species includes C. edulis, which is a synonym of C. cancellatus damascenus[42]. The corms are sold in local markets in Syria[89]. Plants tend to move considerably from their original planting place because of their means of vegetative reproduction, it is therefore wise not to grow different species in close proximity[1]. The flowers are only open during the day time, closing at night[245].

References

Temperature Converter

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Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a light sandy soil in pots in a cold frame[1]. The seed can also be sown in a cold frame in early spring[1]. Sow thinly because the seed usually germinates freely[1], within 1 - 6 months at 18°c[164]. Unless the seed has been sown too thickly, do not transplant the seedlings in their first year of growth, but give them regular liquid feeds to make sure they do not become deficient. Divide the small bulbs once the plants have died down, planting 2 - 3 bulbs per 8cm pot. Grow them on for another 2 years in a greenhouse or frame and plant them out into their permanent positions when dormant in late summer[K]. Plants take 3 - 4 years to flower from seed[200]. Division of the clumps after the leaves die down in spring[1, 200]. The bulbs can be replanted direct into their permanent positions if required.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Colchicum autumnaleAutumn Crocus, Meadow Saffron,Bulb0.2 6-9 MLMHSNM03 
Crocus kotschyanus Corm0.3 4-8  LMNDM10 
Crocus nudiflorus Corm0.2 4-8  LMSNDM23 
Crocus sativusSaffronCorm0.1 5-9  LMSNDM332
Crocus serotinus Corm0.1 5-9  LMSNDM20 

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Author

Herb.

Botanical References

50200

Links / References

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Subject : Crocus cancellatus  
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