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Brassica oleracea ramosa - DC.

Common Name Perpetual Kale
Family Brassicaceae or Cruciferae
USDA hardiness Coming soon
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Not known in the wild.
Range A cultivated form of B. oleracea.
Edibility Rating    (4 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care
Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Brassica oleracea ramosa Perpetual Kale


Brassica oleracea ramosa Perpetual Kale

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Brassica oleracea ramosa is a BIENNIAL/PERENNIAL growing to 0.9 m (3ft).
It is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to August, and the seeds ripen from July to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid and very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Cultivated Beds;

Edible Uses

Leaves - raw or cooked[2, 16, 46]. A strong cabbage flavour, they are delicious if used when fairly young though they can become tough with age[K]. The leaves are usually available from autumn to late spring, and can be harvested all through the winter in all but the very coldest of seasons[K]. Young flowering shoots - raw or cooked. Picked before the flowers open, they are fairly tender and can be used as part of a mixed salad. When cooked, they have a delicious flavour similar to sprouting broccoli[K].

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known

Other Uses

None known

Cultivation details

A very easily grown plant, succeeding in full sun in a well-drained fertile preferably alkaline soil[16, 200]. Prefers a heavy soil[16]. Succeeds in any reasonable soil[37] and will tolerate quite poor conditions[264]. Shade tolerant, growing well on a north border[37]. Succeeds in maritime gardens[200]. Tolerates a pH in the range 4.2 to 8.3. A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to about -15°c[200]. It also tolerates high summer temperatures[200]. Although at one time this group of kales was quite widely grown as a winter leaf crop, it has fallen out of favour somewhat because the leaves are considered be coarser than other vegetables that can be imported from warmer areas in the winter. This is a shame since the plants are very easy to grow, tolerate adverse conditions and are very productive. In addition some of them, particularly the form 'Daubenton', are reliably perennial and will remain productive in the garden for many years[183, K]. Kale plants are less likely to be eaten by pigeons than the other members of this genus[264].

Propagation

Seed - sow in a seedbed outdoors in April/May. Plant out into their permanent positions in the summer as space permits. Do not let the seedlings get overcrowded or they will soon become leggy and will not make such good plants. If your seedlings do get leggy, it is possible to plant them rather deeper into the soil - the buried stems will soon form roots and the plant will be better supported. The perennial forms can be increased by cuttings. These can be taken at almost any time that they are available. Use shoots about 8cm long of the current year's growth and place them in individual pots in the cuttings frame. They root very quickly and easily[K].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Expert comment

Author

DC.

Botanical References

200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Big D   Thu Feb 19 2009

This information is utterly pointless if you're not selling the seed!

Don   Wed Apr 8 2009

Anyone found seed?

Don   Fri Apr 10 2009

It may not produce seeds and if it does these may not come true. I've found Russian Kale at: http://www.plantexplorers.com/twiningvine/index.php/cPath/42?PlantExID=4ab9c8a9053b6fa195a43fba986d07cc also early sprouting brocoli - a bush sized plant, perennial if you don't let it seed.

   Dec 23 2010 12:00AM

From my own experience. In contrary to other Brassica's, this plant is usually propagated by cuttings and not by seed. This Brassica is a perennial and strongly branching. hence the name "ramosa" which means branching. In spring when these branches are about a pencil size you can break them from the motherplant and plant them as a cutting. (Protect against bright sun!!). Very rarely a plant may flower. I have no idea what triggers the flowering. And it may give or give not viable seeds. From hear say, plant originally grown in southern Holland, Belgium and France.

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Subject : Brassica oleracea ramosa  
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