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Ampelopsis arborea - (L.)Koehne.

Common Name Pepper Vine
Family Vitaceae
USDA hardiness 6-9
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Swampy woods[43]. Rich moist soils[235]. Stream bottoms, fence posts and disturbed areas in Texas[274].
Range Southern N. America - Florida to Texas and north to Illinois and Oklahoma.
Edibility Rating    (2 of 5)
Other Uses    (0 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Ampelopsis arborea Pepper Vine


Ampelopsis arborea Pepper Vine
http://plants.usda.gov/

 

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Summary


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of climber
Ampelopsis arborea is an evergreen Climber growing to 10 m (32ft 10in).
See above for USDA hardiness. It is hardy to UK zone 7. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to August. The species is monoecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant).
Suitable for: medium (loamy) soils. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Habitats

Woodland Garden Dappled Shade;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Fruit
Edible Uses:

Fruit - raw or cooked. A poor taste[177]. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter and contains 3 seeds[200, 235]. It is carried in small bunches on the plant, rather like grapes[K]. The flesh is thin and inedible[235].

References   More on Edible Uses

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


None known

References   More on Medicinal Uses

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Other Uses

None known

Special Uses

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

Prefers a deep rich loam in a warm sheltered position in sun or semi-shade[200]. A very ornamental plant[1], when dormant it is quite hardy in Britain, but is better grown on a wall[11]. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun[K]. It rarely flowers or fruits in this country except after a long hot summer[11, 182, 200]. Plants are deciduous in cold winters[219]. Plants climb by means of coiling tendrils but large plants often need tying in to support the weight of foliage[200]. Any pruning is best carried out in the winter[219].

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

Temperature Converter

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Propagation

Seed - sow in pots in a cold frame in the autumn or stratify for 6 weeks at 5°c and sow in the spring[200]. Germination can be quite slow, sometimes taking more than a year. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. When they are more than 20cm tall, they can be planted out into their permanent positions, preferably in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm long, July/August in a frame[78]. Cuttings or eyes in late autumn or winter. Either place them in the ground in a greenhouse or cold frame, or put them in pots. An eye cutting is where you have just one bud at the top and a short length of stem with a small part of the bark removed. These normally root well and grow away vigorously, being ready to plant into their permanent positions the following autumn. Layering into pots in late summer. Partially sever the stem in spring and then lift the new plants in the autumn[78].

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Ampelopsis brevipedunculataPorcelain Berry, Amur peppervine, Blueberry Climber, Porcelain Berry VineClimber20.0 5-8 FLMHSNM221
Ampelopsis humulifolia Climber6.0 4-8  MSNM20 
Ampelopsis japonica Climber10.0 6-9  MSNM02 

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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Expert comment

Author

(L.)Koehne.

Botanical References

1143200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

John P. Willingham   Mon Aug 18 2008

I found it informative. I came across a large area covered in "ampelopsis arborea" while on a wild grape search. Didn't know what they were so did some research. Tasted of the berries and found them to be very sweet. Thinking of collecting and making some jelly just for grins. John P. Willingham, Palestine, Texas

   Jul 25 2011 12:00AM

I recently found a large quantity of "Ampelopsis arborea" growing near my home in a public park. I cautiously tasted the fruit, finding it to be mildly sweet. I've read mixed reports about the "toxicity" of this plant but have had no adverse reactions from my experimentation with the plant. I may make some juice from it to see how it tastes. I'd love to know more about the nutrients, if any, this fruit offers to humans and whether it has any medicinal uses in alternative medicine.

   Oct 11 2014 12:00AM

I have tried eating Ampelopsis fruits and they are not edible. They are full of oxalate crystals and will cause one's mouth to swell up.

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