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Sanguisorba minor - Scop.

Common Name Salad Burnet, Small burnet
Family Rosaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Grassland, usually on calcareous soils[9, 17, 37].
Range Europe, including Britain, from Sweden south and east to France, Armenia and Iran.
Edibility Rating    (4 of 5)
Other Uses    (3 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (2 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full sun
Sanguisorba minor Salad Burnet, Small burnet


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:108_Poterium_sanguisorba_L.jpg
Sanguisorba minor Salad Burnet, Small burnet
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Kelson

 

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Summary

Also known by the scientific name Poterium sanguisorba.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of flower
Sanguisorba minor is an evergreen Perennial growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in).
See above for USDA hardiness. It is hardy to UK zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf all year, in flower from May to August, and the seeds ripen from July to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

Poterium dictyocarpum. P. sanguisorba.

Plant Habitats

 Lawn; Meadow;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Leaves  Shoots
Edible Uses: Tea

Young leaves and shoots - raw or cooked[2, 5, 9, 14, 21]. They are best used before the plant comes into flower[9]. Eaten in salads, used as a garnish or added to soups, cooling drinks and claret cups[183]. Young seedlings are boiled and eaten[183]. A bit fiddly to harvest and the leaves sometimes become bitter in hot dry summers, but they are usually fairly mild tasting in the winter and some people detect a cucumber flavour to them[K]. In the acid soil of our Cornish trial grounds, the leaves have a distinctly bitter flavour, though when the same plants were grown on a chalky soil they had a much milder flavour[K]. The leaves contain about 5.65% protein, 1.2% fat, 11% carbohydrate, 1.7% ash, 74.5% water[179]. A herb tea is made from the dried leaves[21, 183].

References   More on Edible Uses

Composition
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.
Leaves (Dry weight)
  • 0 Calories per 100g
  • Water : 0%
  • Protein: 11.1g; Fat: 2g; Carbohydrate: 80.4g; Fibre: 18g; Ash: 6.5g;
  • Minerals - Calcium: 0mg; Phosphorus: 0mg; Iron: 0mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;
  • Vitamins - A: 0mg; Thiamine (B1): 0mg; Riboflavin (B2): 0mg; Niacin: 0mg; B6: 0mg; C: 0mg;
  • Reference: [ 218]
  • Notes:

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Astringent  Diaphoretic  Eczema  Skin  Styptic

Both the root and the leaves are astringent, diaphoretic and styptic, though the root is most active[4]. The plant is an effective wound herb, quickly staunching any bleeding[244]. An infusion is used in the treatment of gout and rheumatism[244]. The leaves can be used fresh, or are harvested in July and dried (the plant should be prevented from flowering)[4]. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried[4]. An infusion of the leaves is used as a soothing treatment for sunburn or skin troubles such as eczema[201].

References   More on Medicinal Uses

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Other Uses

Soil reclamation  Soil stabilization

Plants have extensive root systems and are used for erosion control, they are also used to reclaim landfills and mined-out terrain[160]. A dynamic accumulator gathering minerals or nutrients from the soil and storing them in a more bioavailable form - used as fertilizer or to improve mulch.

Special Uses

Dynamic accumulator  Food Forest

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

Prefers a light dry calcareous soil[1, 37, 200] but succeeds in most good soils[1, 37]. Plants also succeed in poor soils[4]. One report says that it grows well in marshy soil[24] but this is possibly a mistake[K]. Dislikes shade[14]. Occasionally cultivated in the herb garden, this is an evergreen herbaceous plant and it supplies fresh edible leaves all the year round, even in quite severe winters[K]. When grown as a salad, the plant should be prevented from flowering[4]. Grows well in the spring meadow[24]. Makes a good edging plant in the border[200]. Plants often self-sow, sometimes to the point of nuisance[K]. The plant is heat tolerant in zones 8 through 1. (Plant Hardiness Zones show how well plants withstand cold winter temperatures. Plant Heat Zones show when plants would start suffering from the heat. The Plant Heat Zone map is based on the number of "heat days" experienced in a given area where the temperature climbs to over 86 degrees F (30°C). At this temperature, many plants begin to suffer physiological damage. Heat Zones range from 1 (no heat days) to 12 (210 or more heat days). For example Heat Zone. 11-1 indicates that the plant is heat tolerant in zones 11 through 1.) For polyculture design as well as the above-ground architecture (form - tree, shrub etc. and size shown above) information on the habit and root pattern is also useful and given here if available. The plant growth habit is a clumper with limited spread [1-2]. The root pattern is rhizomatous with underground stems sending roots and shoots along their length [1-2].

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

Temperature Converter

Type a value in the Celsius field to convert the value to Fahrenheit:

Fahrenheit:

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The PFAF Bookshop

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Plant Propagation

Seed - sow March/April or September/October in a cold frame. Germinates in 3 weeks. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle into individual pots. Plant them out in the spring or early summer. The seed can also be sown in situ in spring or autumn if you have sufficient seed. Division in spring.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

TEMPERATE ASIA: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Ciscaucasia, Cyprus, Dagestan, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Russian Federation, Russian Federation-Ciscaucasia, Russian Federation-Western Siberia, Syria, Turkey, Western Siberia,Afghanistan. EUROPE: Denmark, United Kingdom (U.K.), Ireland, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Russian Federation-European part, European part, Lithuania, Ukraine (incl. Krym), Albania, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Greece (incl. Crete), Croatia, Italy (incl. Sardinia, Sicily), North Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, France, Portugal, AFRICA: Spain, Canarias, Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia.

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

Related Plants
Latin NameCommon NameHabitHeightHardinessGrowthSoilShadeMoistureEdibleMedicinalOther
Sanguisorba annuaPrairie BurnetAnnual/Biennial0.6 -  LMHSNM11 
Sanguisorba canadensisAmerican Great Burnet, Canadian burnetPerennial1.2 4-8  LMHSNM10 
Sanguisorba menziesiiMenzies' burnetPerennial1.2 -  LMHSNMWe11 
Sanguisorba obtusaJapanese burnetPerennial1.0 4-9 MLMHSNMWe10 
Sanguisorba officinalisGreat BurnetPerennial1.0 4-8  LMHSNDMWe232
Sanguisorba stipulata Perennial2.0 4-8  LMHSNMWe11 
Sanguisorba tenuifolia Perennial1.2 4-8  LMHSNMWe10 

Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

Expert comment

Author

Scop.

Botanical References

17200

Links / References

For a list of references used on this page please go here

Readers comment

Klaus Dichtel   Wed Jan 22 19:04:20 2003

My experience is, that most of the plant freezes down in severe frosts but the youngest leaves that stay green down to at least -11°C.

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