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Acer saccharum grandidentatum - (Torr.&A.Gray.)Desmarais.

Common Name Big-Tooth Maple, Canyon Maple, Rocky Mountain Sugar Maple
Family Aceraceae
USDA hardiness 5-8
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Found in moist sites such as wet canyons, valleys and the banks of mountain streams at elevations of 1200 - 2100 metres[229].
Range Western N. America - Rocky Mountains.
Edibility Rating    (4 of 5)
Other Uses    (3 of 5)
Weed Potential No
Medicinal Rating    (0 of 5)
Care (info)
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun
Acer saccharum grandidentatum Big-Tooth Maple, Canyon Maple, Rocky Mountain Sugar Maple


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Acer saccharum grandidentatum Big-Tooth Maple, Canyon Maple, Rocky Mountain Sugar Maple

 

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Summary

Bloom Color: Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Form: Rounded.


Physical Characteristics

 icon of manicon of lolypop
Acer saccharum grandidentatum is a deciduous Tree growing to 12 m (39ft) by 8 m (26ft).
See above for USDA hardiness. It is hardy to UK zone 3. It is in flower from April to May, and the seeds ripen in September.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

UK Hardiness Map US Hardiness Map

Synonyms

A. grandidentatum. Nutt.

Habitats

Woodland Garden Canopy;

Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Inner bark  Sap  Seed
Edible Uses: Sweetener

The sap is relatively rich in sugar and can be made into a drink or concentrated into a syrup by boiling off the water[1, 2, 11, 34, 57]. The syrup is used as a sweetener on many foods. It can be harvested in late winter or early spring[[142], the flow is best on a warm sunny day after a frost. Trees on southern slopes in sandy soils give the best yields. It is best to make a hole about 7cm deep and about 1.3 metres above the ground[171]. Yields of 40 - 100 litres per tree can be obtained[142]. The best sap production comes from cold-winter areas with continental climates. Seed - boiled then roasted[62, 105, 159]. The seed is about 6mm long and is produced in small clusters[82]. Inner bark cooked. It is dried, ground into a powder and then used as a thickening in soups etc or mixed with cereals when making bread[105, 161].

References   More on Edible Uses

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.


None known

References   More on Medicinal Uses

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Other Uses

Fuel  Preservative  Wood

The leaves are packed around apples, rootcrops etc to help preserve them[18, 20]. Wood - close grained, tough, hard, heavy. Used for furniture, ship building, etc[46, 61, 82, 171]. It is a good fuel.

Special Uses

References   More on Other Uses

Cultivation details

Landscape Uses:Firewood, Pest tolerant, Specimen, Street tree. Of easy cultivation, it prefers a good moist well-drained soil but succeeds on most soils[11, 98]. Chlorosis can often develop as a result of iron deficiency when the plants are grown in alkaline soils. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Trees need full light and a lot of space if they are to grow well[98]. Plants are hardy to about -45°c when fully dormant[160]. This species is not a great success in Britain[1], though it does better than once thought[11]. It grows well in Cornwall[59]. Slow growing when young[11]. Plants produce prodigious root growth but very little top growth in first year from seed[133]. A very ornamental tree[1] but a bad companion plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants[18, 20]. This species is commercially exploited in America for its sap[1, 11]. Along with A. saccharum and the sub-species A. s. nigrum it is the major source of maple syrup[11]. There are some named varieties[183]. The sap can be tapped within 10 - 15 years from seed but it does not flow so well in areas with mild winters[160]. Special Features:North American native, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.

References   Carbon Farming Information and Carbon Sequestration Information

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Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame, it usually germinates in the following spring. A lot of the seed is non-viable, it is best to cut a few open to see if there is an embryo[113]. An average of 95% germination can be achieved from viable seed[98]. Pre-soak stored seed for 24 hours and then stratify for 2 - 4 months at 1 - 8°c. It can be slow to germinate, sometimes taking two years[125]. The seed can be harvested 'green' (when it has fully developed but before it has dried and produced any germination inhibitors) and sown immediately. It should germinate in late winter. If the seed is harvested too soon it will produce very weak plants or no plants at all[80, 113]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on until they are 20cm or more tall before planting them out in their permanent positions. Layering, which takes about 12 months, is successful with most species in this genus. Cuttings of young shoots in June or July. The cuttings should have 2 - 3 pairs of leaves, plus one pair of buds at the base. Remove a very thin slice of bark at the base of the cutting, rooting is improved if a rooting hormone is used. The rooted cuttings must show new growth during the summer before being potted up otherwise they are unlikely to survive the winter.

Other Names

If available other names are mentioned here

Found In

Countries where the plant has been found are listed here if the information is available

Weed Potential

Right plant wrong place. We are currently updating this section. Please note that a plant may be invasive in one area but may not in your area so it’s worth checking.

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants Status :

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Growth: S = slow M = medium F = fast. Soil: L = light (sandy) M = medium H = heavy (clay). pH: A = acid N = neutral B = basic (alkaline). Shade: F = full shade S = semi-shade N = no shade. Moisture: D = dry M = Moist We = wet Wa = water.

 

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(Torr.&A.Gray.)Desmarais.

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