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Phyllostachys nidularia - Munro.                
                 
Common Name Big-Node Bamboo
Family Poaceae or Gramineae
Synonyms
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Usually in forest or bush at elevations up to 1300 metres[266].
Range E. Asia - N. and C. China.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Semi-shade Full sun

Summary       

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of flower
Phyllostachys nidularia is an evergreen Bamboo growing to 6 m (19ft) by 6 m (19ft).
It is hardy to zone 7. It is in leaf 12-Jan. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.

USDA hardiness zone : Coming soon


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Phyllostachys nidularia Big-Node Bamboo


Phyllostachys nidularia Big-Node Bamboo
   
Habitats       
Woodland Garden Dappled Shade; Shady Edge; Hedge;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts: Stem.
Edible Uses:

Young shoots - cooked. Highly prized in China, both for their earliness and their delicate flavour[195], they taste somewhat like hominy corn[183]. Neither acrid nor bitter, even in the raw state. The shoots, which are about 4cm in diameter[266] are harvested in the spring when they are about 8cm above the ground, cutting them about 5cm below soil level.
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.



None known
Other Uses
Hedge;  Hedge;  Plant support;  Soil stabilization;  Wood.

The plant has been suggested as being useful for soil and water stabilization on hills and levees[195]. The canes are strong and useful in their whole state, but do not split well[195]. They can be used for plant supports etc.
Cultivation details                                         
Requires a rich damp soil in a sheltered position. Dislikes prolonged exposure to hard frosts. New growth begins in early spring. This is a good companion species to grow in a woodland because the plants are shallow rooted and do not compete with deep rooted trees[195]. This species is notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. Plants only flower at intervals of many years. When they do come into flower most of the plants energies are directed into producing seed and consequently the plant is severely weakened. They sometimes die after flowering, but if left alone they will usually recover though they will look very poorly for a few years. If fed with artificial NPK fertilizers at this time the plants are more likely to die[122].
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - surface sow as soon as it is ripe in a greenhouse at about 20°c. Do not allow the compost to dry out. Germination usually takes place fairly quickly so long as the seed is of good quality, though it can take 3 - 6 months. Grow on in a lightly shaded place in the greenhouse until large enough to plant out. Seed is rarely available. Division in spring as new growth commences. Divisions from the open ground do not transplant well, so will need careful treatment and nurturing under cover in pots until at least late spring[238]. Division is best carried out in wet weather and small divisions will establish better than large clumps[238]. Another report says that you can take large divisions from established clumps and transfer them straight to their permanent positions, misting or drenching them frequently until they are established[200]. Basal cane cuttings in spring.
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
Munro.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
266
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         

[122]? The Plantsman. Vol. 1. 1979 - 1980.
Excerpts from the periodical giving cultivation details and other notes on some of the useful plants. A good article on the flowering of bamboos.
[183]Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants.
Excellent. Contains a very wide range of conventional and unconventional food plants (including tropical) and where they can be obtained (mainly N. American nurseries but also research institutes and a lot of other nurseries from around the world.
[195]Farrelly. D. The Book of Bamboo
Very readable, giving lots of information on the uses of bamboos, both temperate and tropical.
[200]Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
[238]Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses.
A very well presented and informative book on herbs from around the globe. Plenty in it for both the casual reader and the serious student. Just one main quibble is the silly way of having two separate entries for each plant.
[266] Flora of China
On-line version of the Flora - an excellent resource giving basic info on habitat and some uses.

Readers comment                                         
 
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