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Echinacea pallida - (Nutt.)Nutt.                
                 
Common Name Cone Flower, Pale purple coneflower
Family Asteraceae or Compositae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards Possible suppression of immunity with habitual use. High doses over 1000 mg may cause dizziness. Use of herb for 10-14 days recommended followed by a short break.
Habitats Dry soils[235] on prairies and barrens[43]. Sandy open woods and prairies in Texas[274].
Range N. America - Michigan to Nebraska and south to Texas.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Full sun

Summary       

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of flower
Echinacea pallida is a PERENNIAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Synonyms
Brauneria pallida. Rudbeckia pallida.
Echinacea pallida Cone Flower, Pale purple coneflower


Echinacea pallida Cone Flower, Pale purple coneflower
   
Habitats       
 Cultivated Beds;
Edible Uses                                         
None known
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Adaptogen;  Alterative;  Antiseptic;  Appetizer;  Depurative;  Diaphoretic;  Digestive;  Sialagogue.

Plants in this genus were probably the most frequently used of N. American Indian herbal remedies, though this species is considered to be less active than E. angustifolia[222]. They had a very wide range of applications and many of these uses have been confirmed by modern science. The plant has a general stimulatory effect on the immune system and is widely used in modern herbal treatments[222]. There has been some doubt over the ability of the body to absorb the medicinally active ingredients orally (intravenous injections being considered the only effective way to administer the plant), but recent research has demonstrated significant absorption from orally administered applications[222]. In Germany over 200 pharmaceutical preparations are made from Echinacea[222]. The roots and the whole plant are considered particularly beneficial in the treatment of sores, wounds, burns etc, possessing cortisone-like and antibacterial activity[222]. The plant was used by N. American Indians as a universal application to treat the bites and stings of all types of insects[213]. An infusion of the plant was also used to treat snakebites[213]. The plant is adaptogen, alterative, antiseptic, depurative, diaphoretic, digestive, sialagogue[4, 21, 61, 165, 213]. It is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use[238]. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Echinacea for common cold, cough and bronchitis, fevers and cold, urinary tract infections, inflammation of the mouth and pharynx, increase resistance to infection, wounds and burns (see [302] for critics of commission E).
Other Uses
None known
Cultivation details                                         
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil[111] but prefers a deep rich loam with plenty of leafmold[1] and a sunny position[175]. Slugs love this plant[K].
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - sow March/April in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed[175, K]. Diurnal temperature fluctuations aid germination[175]. The seed usually germinates in 10 - 21 days at 25°c[175]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots once they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the greenhouse for the first summer. Plant them out in the late spring or early summer of the following year and give them some protection from slugs at least until they are established[K]. Division in spring or autumn[111]. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring. Root cuttings, October in a frame[200].
Related Plants                                         
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Echinacea angustifoliaEchinacea, Blacksamson echinacea, Strigose blacksamson05
Echinacea purpureaEchinacea, Eastern purple coneflower, Hedge Coneflower, Black Sampson , Purple Coneflower15
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
(Nutt.)Nutt.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
43200
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment                                         
 
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Subject : Echinacea pallida  
             
                                        
                                                                                 
                                                                                 
   
 

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