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Crataegus laevigata - (Poir.)DC.                
                 
Common Name Midland Hawthorn, Smooth hawthorn, English Hawthorn
Family Rosaceae
USDA hardiness 4-8
Known Hazards None known
Habitats Woods, hedges, thickets etc on clays and heavy loams, especially in E. Britain[17, 186]. Where found in hedges it is often as a relict of ancient woodland[186].
Range Europe, including Britain, from Sweden to Spain, eastwards to Poland.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Moist Soil Wet Soil Full shade Semi-shade Full sun

Summary       
Bloom Color: Lavender, Pink, White. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Form: Oval, Pyramidal.

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of shrub
Crataegus laevigata is a deciduous Shrub growing to 6 m (19ft) by 6 m (19ft) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from Sep to November. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Midges.It is noted for attracting wildlife.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist or wet soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

Synonyms
C. oxyacantha. C. oxyacanthoides.
Crataegus laevigata Midland Hawthorn, Smooth hawthorn, English  Hawthorn


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crataegus-laevigata-berries.jpg
Crataegus laevigata Midland Hawthorn, Smooth hawthorn, English  Hawthorn
   
Habitats
Woodland Garden Secondary; Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; not Deep Shade; Hedge;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts: Fruit;  Leaves.
Edible Uses: Coffee;  Tea.

Fruit - raw or cooked[2, 9, 12, 183]. A dry and mealy texture, they are not very appetizing[K]. The fruit can be used for jams and preserves[9]. The fruit pulp can be dried, ground into a meal and mixed with flour in making bread etc[46, 183]. The fruit is about 1cm in diameter[200]. There are up to five fairly large seeds in the centre of the fruit, these often stick together and so the effect is of eating a cherry-like fruit with a single seed[K]. Young leaves and young shoots - raw[5, 177]. A tasty nibble, they are nice in a salad[K]. Young leaves are a tea substitute[21, 46, 177, 183]. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute[12, 21, 183].
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Antiarrhythmic;  Antispasmodic;  Astringent;  Cardiotonic;  Diuretic;  Hypotensive;  Sedative;  Tonic;  Vasodilator.

Hawthorn is an extremely valuable medicinal herb. It is used mainly for treating disorders of the heart and circulation system, especially angina[254]. Western herbalists consider it a 'food for the heart', it increases the blood flow to the heart muscles and restores normal heart beat[254]. This effect is brought about by the presence of bioflavonoids in the fruit, these bioflavonoids are also strongly antioxidant, helping to prevent or reduce degeneration of the blood vessels[254]. The fruit is antispasmodic, cardiac, diuretic, sedative, tonic and vasodilator[4, 9, 21, 46, 165]. Both the fruits and flowers of hawthorns are well-known in herbal folk medicine as a heart tonic and modern research has borne out this use. The fruits and flowers have a hypotensive effect as well as acting as a direct and mild heart tonic[222]. They are especially indicated in the treatment of weak heart combined with high blood pressure[222], they are also used to treat a heart muscle weakened by age, for inflammation of the heart muscle, arteriosclerosis and for nervous heart problems[21]. Prolonged use is necessary for the treatment to be efficacious[222]. It is normally used either as a tea or a tincture[222]. Hawthorn is combined with ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) to enhance poor memory, working by improving the blood supply to the brain[254]. The bark is astringent and has been used in the treatment of malaria and other fevers[7]. The roots are said to stimulate the arteries of the heart[218].
Other Uses
Charcoal;  Fuel;  Hedge;  Hedge;  Rootstock;  Wood.

A good hedge plant, it is very tolerant of neglect and is able to regenerate if cut back severely, it makes a good thorny stock-proof barrier[186] and resists very strong winds. It can be used in layered hedges[11, 29]. The plant is often used as a rootstock for several species of garden fruit such as the medlar (Mespilus germanica) and the pear (Pyrus communis sativa)[4]. Wood - very hard and tough but difficult to work[7, 46, 61]. It has a fine grain and takes a beautiful polish but is seldom large enough to be of great value[4]. It is used for tool handles and making small wooden articles etc[4, 7, 46, 61]. The wood is valued in turning and makes an excellent fuel, giving out a lot of heat, more so even than oak wood[4]. Charcoal made from the wood is said to be able to melt pig iron without the aid of a blast[4].
Cultivation details                                         
Landscape Uses:Border, Espalier, Pollard, Specimen, Street tree. A very easily grown plant, it prefers a well-drained moisture retentive loamy soil but is not at all fussy[11, 200]. Once established, it succeeds in excessively moist soils and also tolerates drought[200]. It grows well on a chalk soil and also in heavy clay soils[200]. A position in full sun is best when plants are being grown for their fruit, they also succeed in semi-shade though fruit yields and quality will be lower in such a position[11, 200]. Most members of this genus succeed in exposed positions, they also tolerate atmospheric pollution[200].. A true woodland species, it grows well in quite dense shade[17, 186]. A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to at least -18°c[202]. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[200]. Closely allied to C. monogyna, it often hybridizes with that species in the wild when growing in its proximity[186]. There are many named forms selected for their ornamental value[200]. Seedling trees take from 5 - 8 years before they start bearing fruit, though grafted trees will often flower heavily in their third year[K]. The flowers have a foetid smell somewhat like decaying fish. This attracts midges which are the main means of fertilization. When freshly open, the flowers have more pleasant scent with balsamic undertones[245]. Seedlings should not be left in a seedbed for more than 2 years without being transplanted[11]. An important food plant for the larvae of many lepidoptera species[30]. Special Features:Not North American native, Blooms are very showy.
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - this is best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame, some of the seed will germinate in the spring, though most will probably take another year. Stored seed can be very slow and erratic to germinate, it should be warm stratified for 3 months at 15°c and then cold stratified for another 3 months at 4°c[164]. It may still take another 18 months to germinate[78]. Scarifying the seed before stratifying it might reduce this time[80]. Fermenting the seed for a few days in its own pulp may also speed up the germination process[K]. Another possibility is to harvest the seed 'green' (as soon as the embryo has fully developed but before the seedcoat hardens) and sow it immediately in a cold frame. If timed well, it can germinate in the spring[80]. If you are only growing small quantities of plants, it is best to pot up the seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in individual pots for their first year, planting them out in late spring into nursery beds or their final positions. When growing larger quantities, it might be best to sow them directly outdoors in a seedbed, but with protection from mice and other seed-eating creatures. Grow them on in the seedbed until large enough to plant out, but undercut the roots if they are to be left undisturbed for more than two years.
Related Plants                                         
Latin NameCommon NameEdibility RatingMedicinal Rating
Crataegus acclivis 42
Crataegus aestivalisEastern Mayhaw, May hawthorn, Mayhaw, Apple Hawthorn32
Crataegus altaicaAltai Mountain Thorn32
Crataegus anomalaArnold hawthorn32
Crataegus apiifoliaParsley-Leaved Hawthorn22
Crataegus aprica 32
Crataegus armena 22
Crataegus arnoldiana 52
Crataegus atrosanguinea 32
Crataegus azarolusAzarole42
Crataegus baroussana 42
Crataegus caesa 42
Crataegus calpodendronPear Hawthorn32
Crataegus canadensisCanadian hawthorn22
Crataegus canbyiCockspur hawthorn, Dwarf Hawthorn, Cockspur Hawthorn22
Crataegus champlainensisQuebec hawthorn42
Crataegus chlorosarca 32
Crataegus chrysocarpaFireberry Hawthorn, Red haw, Piper's hawthorn,32
Crataegus coccinoidesKansas Hawthorn32
Crataegus columbianaColumbian Hawthorn32
Crataegus crus-galliCockspur Thorn, Cockspur hawthorn, Dwarf Hawthorn22
Crataegus cuneataSanzashi, Chinese hawthorn33
Crataegus dilatataBroadleaf hawthorn32
Crataegus dispessaMink hawthorn32
Crataegus douglasiiBlack Hawthorn42
Crataegus durobrivensis 42
Crataegus ellwangerianaScarlet Hawthorn52
Crataegus elongata 42
Crataegus festiva 52
Crataegus flabellataFanleaf hawthorn32
123
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Expert comment                                         
 
      
Author                                         
(Poir.)DC.
                                                                                 
Botanical References                                         
1117200
                                                                                 
Links / References                                         
For a list of references used on this page please go here
Readers comment                                         
 
Lisa R.
The wikipedia site says this tree/shrub is 0.5-6 Meters in height where as the pfaf says 15 Meters. Are they talking about different species? Oct 2 2011 12:00AM
wikipedia
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Subject : Crataegus laevigata  
             
                                        
                                                                                 
                                                                                 
   
 

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