We have over 100,000 visitors each month, but in the whole of 2013 less than £1,000 was raised from donations. We rely on donations and cannot continue to maintain our database and website unless this increases considerably in 2014. Please make a donation today. More information on our financial position >>>
Search Page Content
   Bookmark and Share
   
    By donating to PFAF, you can help support and expand our activities
    Plant Suppliers: Click here for a List

Plant Database Search Page:
Edible, Medicinal and other uses of over 7,000 plants
Search for name:
        

Common or botanical Name or Family. You can use a fragment of a name if you are unsure of the spelling.

Search for keyword:
         
Plant uses and habitats. See below for full list of keywords.
                               
Browse
> Latin names: A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z
> Common names: A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Z 
> Family ( shows classification of plants into division, order, families, etc.)
> Habitat (all the different habitats you can search for)
> Edible Uses (full list and description of edible uses)
> Medicinal Uses (full list and description of medicinal uses
> Other Uses (fibre, wood, etc)
Search for word:
        
                               
Search by Use & Properties
Select any of the keywords below to locate plants with this property. Select the 'HELP' link below the column to get more information on the keywords used and further database links. Select the 'Help with these terms' link to see a helpful reference list of keywords while selecting.
** Less is more! The fewer conditions specified the more plant will be returned. Help with these terms
Edible Rating
1 Minor 2 3 4 5 Great
Medicinal Rating
1 Minor 2 3 4 5 Great
Edible Uses
Chocolate
Coffee
Colouring
Condiment
Curdling agent
Drink
Egg
Gelatine
Gum
Milk
Oil
Pectin
Rutin
Salt
Stabilizer
Sweetener
Tea
Help
Medicinal Uses
Abortifacient
Acrid
Adaptogen
Alterative
Anaesthetic
Analgesic
Anaphrodisiac
Anodyne
Antacid
Anthelmintic
Antiaphonic
Antiarthritic
Antiasthmatic
Antibacterial
Antibilious
Antibiotic
Anticholesterolemic
Anticoagulant
Antidandruff
Antidermatosic
Antidote
Antiecchymotic
Antiemetic
Antifungal
Antihaemorrhoidal
Antihalitosis
Antihydrotic
Antiinflammatory
Antiperiodic
Antiphlogistic
Antipruritic
Antipyretic
Antirheumatic
Antiscorbutic
Antiscrophulatic
Antiseptic
Antispasmodic
Antitumor
Antitussive
Antivinous
Antiviral
Aperient
Aphrodisiac
Appetizer
Aromatherapy
Aromatic
Astringent
Bach
Balsamic
Birthing aid
Bitter
Blood purifier
Blood tonic
Cancer
Cardiac
Cardiotonic
Carminative
Cathartic
Cholagogue
Contraceptive
Cytostatic
Cytotoxic
Decongestant
Demulcent
Deobstruent
Deodorant
Depurative
Detergent
Diaphoretic
Digestive
Disinfectant
Diuretic
Emetic
Emmenagogue
Emollient
Enuresis
Errhine
Expectorant
Febrifuge
Foot care
Galactofuge
Galactogogue
Haemolytic
Haemostatic
Hallucinogenic
Hepatic
Homeopathy
Hydrogogue
Hypnotic
Hypoglycaemic
Hypotensive
Infertility
Irritant
Kidney
Laxative
Lenitive
Lithontripic
Miscellany
Mouthwash
Mydriatic
Narcotic
Nervine
Nutritive
Odontalgic
Ophthalmic
Oxytoxic
Parasiticide
Pectoral
Plaster
Poultice
Purgative
Refrigerant
Resolvent
Restorative
Rubefacient
Salve
Sedative
Sialagogue
Skin
Sternutatory
Stimulant
Stings
Stomachic
Styptic
TB
Tonic
Uterine tonic
Vasoconstrictor
Vasodilator
VD
Vermifuge
Vesicant
Vulnerary
Warts
Women's complaints
Vitamin C
Antiflatulent
Antihistamine
Anticonvulsant
Antineoplastics
Appetite Stimulants
Appetite Suppressant
Antianxiety
Antipanic
Antipsoriatic
Antiseborrheic
Antiarrhythmic
Antidepressant
Antidiarrhoeal
Help
Other Uses
Adhesive
Alcohol
Baby care
Basketry
Beads
Bedding
Besom
Biomass
Blotting paper
Bottles
Broom
Brush
Buttons
Charcoal
Cleanser
Compost
Containers
Cork
Cosmetic
Cotton wool
Darning ball
Deodorant
Disinfectant
Dye
Essential
Fencing
Fertilizer
Fibre
Filter
Fire retardant
Friction sticks
Fruit ripening
Fuel
Fungicide
Furniture
Green manure
Gum
Hair
Hedge
Herbicide
Incense
Ink
Insecticide
Insulation
Kindling
Lacquer
Latex
Leather
Lighting
Lining
Liquid feed
Litmus
Microscope
Miscellany
Mordant
Mulch
Musical
Nails
Needles
Oil
Packing
Paint
Paper
Parasiticide
Pectin
Pencil
Pins
Pioneer
Pipes
Pitch
Plant breeding
Plant support
Plaster
Polish
Pollution
Porcelain
Potash
Pot-pourri
Preservative
Raffia
Repellent
Resin
Roofing
Rooting hormone
Rootstock
Rust
Sandpaper
Scourer
Shelterbelt
Size
Soap
Soap making
Soil conditioner
Soil reclamation
Soil stabilization
Starch
Straw
Strewing
String
Stuffing
Tannin
Teeth
Thatching
Tinder
Varnish
Waterproofing
Wax
Waxed paper
Weather forecasting
Weather protection
Weaving
Wick
Wood
Help
Special Uses
Nitrogen Fixer
Attracts Wildlife
Scented Plants
Hedge
Ground Cover
Help
Edible Parts
Flowers
Fruit
Inner bark
Leaves
Manna
Nectar
Pollen
Root
Sap
Seed
Seedpod
Stem
Oil
Help
Properties
Habit
Tree
Shrub
Annual
Biennial
Perennial
Annual/Biennial
Annual/Perennial
Bamboo
Bulb
Corm
Fern
Litchen
Climber
Annual Climber
Perennial Climber
Decid/Evergreen
Height
Width
Hardiness PFAF UK
                                How hardy is it on a scale from 1 - 10. One will survive arctic winters, ten is tropical. Cornwall is about eight, but can grow some plants from zone nine. Most of Britain is zone seven, going down to zone six in the north and four in the mountains.
Hardiness USDA
                                ** Limited Plant Entries. We are starting to add information April 2014. USDA hardness zone: a geographically defined area in witch a pecific category of plant life is capable of growing, as defined by dimatic conditions, including its ability to withstand the minimum temperatures of the zone. For Example, a plant that is described as "hardy to zone 10" means that the Plant can withstand a minimum temperature of -1 C(30 F). Amore resilient plant that is "Hardy to zone 9" can tolerate a minimum temprature of -7 C(19 F).More>>
Growth Rate
Soil
pH
Shade
                                Full Shade: deep woodland, a north-facing wall etc; Semi Shade: light woodland, a position that is shaded for part of the day etc; No Shade: is unshaded positions.
Moisture
Wind
Tolerates Pollution
Frost Tender
Flowering times and types
Month :         Jan      Feb     Mar    Apr    May    June    July    Aug   Sept   Oct   Nov    Dec
In Leaf :
Flowering time:
Seed ripens:
Flower Type
                                Hermaphrodite: the flower has both male and female organs. Monoecious: individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant. Dioecious: individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.
Pollinators
                                Apomictic: reproduce by seeds formed without sexual fusion. Cleistogomous: self-pollinating without flowers ever opening. Lepidoptera: Moths & Butterflies.
         
Other Options:
> Download the database for use at home or get it sent on CD-ROM.
> Download the full Species Database Bibliography (270 references).
> Help Us Improve The Database.
> Help with these terms
                               
General Disclaimer
To the best of our knowledge all the information contained herein is accurate and true.

However we cannot guarantee that everyone will react positively to all edible plants or other plant uses.

It is commonly known that many people suffer allergic reactions to conventional foods and products. Even amongst the more commonly eaten fruits, for example, there are plenty of instances where people react badly to them:
  • Many people are allergic to strawberries and will come out in a rash if they eat them.
  • Some people develop a rash if they touch the stems of parsnips.
  • Potatoes become poisonous if they turn green.
  • Eating large quantities of cabbage can adversely affect the thyroid gland.
In general, we believe that the overall health of people will be greatly improved by bringing more diversity into their diet and through using more natural products.

We strongly recommend the following preventative precautions when trying anything new:
  • Make sure you have identified the plant correctly
  • Try a small taste of anything new in your diet. If there are no side effects increase the quantity at the next meal.
  • When trying new soaps or skin applications try them on a very small area before proceeding to larger areas of the body. Look for any uncomfortable reactions or changes and if there is do not proceed with further application.
No liability exists against Plants for a Future or any member of Plants for a Future, nor can they be held responsible for any allergy, illness or injurious effect that any person or animal may suffer as a result of information in this catalogue or through using any of the plants mentioned by Plants for a Future.